"The Practical Blacksmithing, Bladesmithing, Artistic Metal Working & Hobbyist Forum"
Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
jmccustomknives

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 934
Reply with quote  #1 
A gentleman I know brought me this, actually saved it from the scrap yard.  I'm not familiar with the name.  It's about 120lbs and has close to 80% rebound and nice ring to boot.  I got to get it cleaned up and put it to work.  
My guess is it's English from the 1890's but we'll find out.  Anyone heard of this brand?
012.JPG  009.JPG  002.JPG


__________________

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

0


Anthony San Miguel

Forge Fire Master
Registered:
Posts: 246
Reply with quote  #2 
Great score! I wish somebody would bring me an anvil, lol. I haven't heard of that brand, but your guess about it being English and late 1800's sounds right to me.
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 959
Reply with quote  #3 
Resembles a mouse hole.
__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
NorrinRadd

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 437
Reply with quote  #4 
Dang dude, that's pretty freaking awesome. Looks like an anchor on it, that's pretty cool.
__________________

Just make something!

OrionsAnvil on YouTube

@OrionsAnvil on Instagram

0
jmccustomknives

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 934
Reply with quote  #5 
Did a little research on this dude.  There in an entry with one of these in the Anvils book, it is incomplete.  The author had 2 of these examples sent to him, as you can see from the stampings, they aren't good.  But the anchor is on all of them.  From my looking around the net, I've run across 2 more besides the ones in the anvil book.  After a little research I think I've figured it out a little.  Thomas Eves & Son was a foundry in Stourbrigde, England that made everything from chains to anchors (could be why there's an anchor) from the 1830's through 1875 were I found an entry of the company going bankrupt (failing).  My best guess going on that knowledge is this one would probably date from 1860-75.
__________________

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

0
Greg A

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #6 
That's a good score. It's crazy that a 150 year old piece of equipment is still operational. There aren't too many things that have that kind of life span. I'm a big fan of metal.
0
jmccustomknives

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 934
Reply with quote  #7 
Correction, it was Thomas Eveson & Sons foundry.
__________________

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.