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David Einhorn

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This is a reproduction bellows that I built for a reproduction Army forge.

Traveling forge Combined Photographs - Labeled.jpg 

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jmccustomknives

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Reply with quote  #2 
Very cool.  I can imagine a young apprentice working it.  Things were different back then.
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Metalmelt

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Reply with quote  #3 
That's a great looking set up. I would use it in my home shop.

I checked out your book, it looks very good as well. I may have to get a copy. Although, I'm not really into re-enactment much.
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Anthony San Miguel

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Reply with quote  #4 
It is very interesting to me that you posted these pictures. I got 6 bellows bladders that look very similar to those in your pictures two weeks ago. I think they have 5 chambers, but they may have only four. I'm not sure. I want to keep 2 but I don't know what I'm going to do with the rest. Once again, I got them from my friend, the old foundry guy who I've been getting a lot of stuff from recently. They are just the bladders with two pipes that run along the sides but they move ALOT of air. If I get home early enough this evening I'll take and post pics.
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David Einhorn

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Basically, except for Willamsburg.all the museum shops within driving distance, as well as Gettysburg are mid-1800s.  Since that time period is the American Civil War, researching equipment, clothing and period technology became, for me,  unavoidable.  I started building the wheeled Civil War "Traveling Forge" just to have something to do, I had no expectation of actually finishing it.  I just pulled out my copy of the government's measured drawings and specifications and started making parts and stacking them in the corner.... for my own entertainment.  I certainly learned a lot making all sorts of parts, especially the wheels.  Two different people have told me that they used the information in my book to reactivate historic museum shops, one shop a blacksmith shop, and the other shop a wheelwright shop.  I could have named the book, Mid-19th Century Blacksmithing and Wheelwrighting" but figured the title of "Civil War" would be easier to find when using a search engine. ..... and after all, where is one going to go for their costume for a mid-1800s historic blacksmith shop..... They will go to suppliers of the U.S. Civil War living history type folks.  [smile]
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Metalmelt

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I used to do colonial period craft shows with the X. I out grew my drop front britches, but I still have a pair of buckle shoes. They were made by a cobbler at one of the shows. I think that's the most I've ever spent on a pair of shoes. Now, junk is coming from China and I can't get $10 for them.
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mtforge

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What size are the shoes. I have to keep getting bigger shoes for my grandson who goes to reenactments with me. We will be going to Spirit of Vincennes http://spiritofvincennes.org/  this weekend. We are bringing a friend of his to help out. It's always expensive to dress everyone out correctly.
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Metalmelt

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I think they are 10 or 10 1/2. They are authentic, no left or right with brass buckles. All leather. I get a picture if you want me to.
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confederatemule

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Reply with quote  #9 
To be authentic, the uniform for the "Southerner", fightin and diein, on the battle field was what he had on when he left the farm. Most likely, if he got any kind of uniform it was taken off of a dead soldier. 
Not nothin like what is seen on TV and in the movies.

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David Einhorn

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Reply with quote  #10 
This thread seems to be covering a wide range of topics:
1) Spirit of Vincennes event according to their website appears to be Colonial 1700s, and not the American War Between the States, mid-1800s.
2) Uniforms of the Confederacy varied according to the year and location of the soldiers.  At the beginning of the conflict uniforms and clothing, especially for those already in a militia or military unit was more available than later in the conflict.  An excellent reference for reading about shortages and politics within the Confederacy is the two volume set of books written by a clerk who was in the War Office of the Confederacy:
http://www.amazon.com/Rebel-War-Clerks-Diary-Vol/dp/0809442124?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00
http://www.amazon.com/Rebel-Clerks-Confederate-States-Capital/dp/0809442418/ref=pd_sim_14_1?ie=UTF8&dpID=41TBXyRmD0L&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL480_SR348%2C480_&refRID=1E2E8VT6JBBR7N146BEC

Other books describing Confederate life from the inside, also includes:
"Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865"  by McCarthy
http://www.amazon.com/Detailed-Minutiae-Northern-1861-1865-Collectors/dp/0809442450/ref=pd_sim_14_3?ie=UTF8&dpID=51eqN6qAl0L&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL320_SR240%2C320_&refRID=1E2E8VT6JBBR7N146BEC

An **analysis** of the clothing and belongings in a classic photo of three Confederate prisoners after the battle of Gettysburg, July 15rh, 1863, can be found at:
http://www.blueandgraymarching.com/articles/three-rebel-prisoners-at-ge.html  

[01451r_med]
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Metalmelt

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Reply with quote  #11 
Threads can go a little sideways sometimes, but it's all good.

There was something about the Columbus Bluejackets hockey team when they first started in Ohio. Their mascot came out in a uniform and many said it was actually a Southern Officers style uniform. I think they have since dropped the whole thing and just gone with a symbol of a star or something.

Of course the Civil War is under attack now as well, no more confederate flags or statues. But, that's another rabbit trail.

I did order your book, should get it this week. Yea! 
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mtforge

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Reply with quote  #12 
"This thread seems to be covering a wide range of topics:
1) Spirit of Vincennes event according to their website appears to be Colonial 1700s, and not the American War Between the States, mid-1800s.
"

Yes, that is the time Spirit of Vincennes covers. But when someone may have colonial shoes I'm going after them.
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Metalmelt

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Reply with quote  #13 
I sent you an e-mail Mtforge.
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confederatemule

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Einhorn
Basically, except for Willamsburg.all the museum shops within driving distance, as well as Gettysburg are mid-1800s.  Since that time period is the American Civil War, researching equipment, clothing and period technology became, for me,  unavoidable.  I started building the wheeled Civil War "Traveling Forge" just to have something to do, I had no expectation of actually finishing it.  I just pulled out my copy of the government's measured drawings and specifications and started making parts and stacking them in the corner.... for my own entertainment.  I certainly learned a lot making all sorts of parts, especially the wheels.  Two different people have told me that they used the information in my book to reactivate historic museum shops, one shop a blacksmith shop, and the other shop a wheelwright shop.  I could have named the book, Mid-19th Century Blacksmithing and Wheelwrighting" but figured the title of "Civil War" would be easier to find when using a search engine. ..... and after all, where is one going to go for their costume for a mid-1800s historic blacksmith shop..... They will go to suppliers of the U.S. Civil War living history type folks.  [smile]


Is the name of your book "Civil War Blacksmithing" by David Einhorn? Where can I buy one?

Mule
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Metalmelt

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Reply with quote  #15 
I went on Amazon and bought it.
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David Einhorn

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Quote:
Originally Posted by confederatemule
Is the name of your book "Civil War Blacksmithing" by David Einhorn? Where can I buy one? Mule


Yes, thank you, it is titled, "Civil War Blacksmithing".  Thank you for your interest.  It is available on Amazon.  Amazon is my favorite place to buy books.  [smile]

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Anthony San Miguel

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Reply with quote  #17 
Here are a few pics of the bellows bladders I got that yours reminded me of. I haven't picked up the valves yet. The steel tank in the background is a big quench tank I also got from him. You can see in the upper corner of the tank there is a water hose connector to keep fresh water flowing in and a drain plug at the bottom.

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