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Kiwi tussock

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Reply with quote  #1 
Has anyone made their own Cut-Off for the anvils Hardy hole?

I cant find one here where I live and so Im wondering if it would be too much of a challenge to make one.
If anyone has an idea of what grade, or what material I could look for at a scrap yard, I'd really appreciate hearing/reading of your suggestion.

Thanks for your interest.

PS. The Hardy hole I need to fill with it, is an inch.
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JackP

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yes I made mine about 5 yrs ago. I used metal from a road tractor torsion bar. It's really tough and takes a lot pounding to shape. I suppose axles that are large enough would work as well.

Cold roll steel would work if you keep your metal hot though I wouldn't recommend it as it's not tough.

If you are going to make it try to make it out of something that will last. My hardy hole is also 1".


Jack
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confederatemule

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Reply with quote  #3 
I've thought of making one out of 1" square stock. I assume it is the same material as cold roll round stock.

Mule
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JackP

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Reply with quote  #4 
1" sq stock comes in many different alloys. 4140 would be a good choice.

The reason the metal needs to be tough is that a hot cut hardy is not usually hard. You can cut mine with a file. If it's hard enough, it would cut your hammer or chip when accidently struck.

If you need one quick, one could take an old chisel and weld a collar on it and grind shank to fit hardy hole. I guess that's cheating but what the heck if it works.

Jack

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confederatemule

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackP
If you need one quick, one could take an old chisel and weld a collar on it and grind shank to fit hardy hole. I guess that's cheating but what the heck if it works.

Jack



I don't consider it cheating. To me, blacksmithing is the art of using what ye have to get what ye need to get a job done without going and spending money.

Mule
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Kiwi tussock

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hey guys, whats with the adverts on the bottom of my 1st query above?
Did I do something wrong to let some barstards add them to my question?
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Kiwi tussock

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hang on.... now I have added this last comment above, they have disappeared! ! ! ! ! ! !
No, I aint hit the bottle. There was 3 separate adverts placed on the bottom of my query to you fellas.
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JackP

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Reply with quote  #8 
Mule, I agree with you 100 %. If it's cheating which it's not, I guilty.
I think it's great to give someone something that they like and tell them that you made it from an old car spring or some other object.

Jack
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anvil

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Reply with quote  #9 
It isn't cheating. It's your shop and your business. [wink]
So how you make it depends on what you want to learn and practice. Forge work or welding work.

It's a hard first job, but a good one because it teaches a lot.

If your hardy hole is 1", start with stock bigger than your hardy hole. It's far easier to draw out a shaft to fit your hardy hole than to upset a 1" bar to make the shoulder. Use a piece long enough so you can hand hold it.
Forge the shaft over the edge of the anvil and make the right angle as clean as possible. Forge to a close fit. Even if it's a bit big, file to fit so it's snug. Taper this shaft for easy in and out. Make it long enough to stick out the bottom a bit in case it gets stuck.
Cut it off and use tongs to hold the shaft. Forge the shaft to the shape you want. Heat treat depending on the steel you use. Car/truck axles are fine. Have fun
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Kiwi tussock

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks for the heads-up Anvil.
I noticed a suggestion to use a piece of steel graded at "4140".
Would that be the same as what you are suggesting with using an vehicles axle?
I periodically call into a truck repair shop & am free to rummage around their large scrap metal bin. A axle would be a nice find ay. Maybe even a front stub axle although you suggestion that it would be best to have something I can hold onto certainly makes sense.

Thanks heaps for your suggestion.

Thanks for your valued input & best wishes to you.
Will
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JackP

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Reply with quote  #11 
Years ago, lots of axles were made of 4140 chrome moly steel of something close. I'm sure the axle what ever the material, would do just fine.

Jack
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Scrambler82

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Reply with quote  #12 
I always wondered what I would use to make a Hot Cut Hardie, looked at some made by others and thought I can make one but still haven't.

I purchased two Hammer Heads with long, flat, chisel ends, and I am hoping somewhere down the road to cut up at least one of them and make a Hardier Tool.



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anvil

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Reply with quote  #13 
Yup, car and truck axles are, or used to be,,,. [wink] 4140 or similar.
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Kiwi tussock

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Reply with quote  #14 
Hey Jack P, Is that "Years ago" like 15 to 20 years ago, or when I say "Long Ago" I'm generally talkin' 50 plus years ago. :-)

Thanks for your hint though. I have a cobber who has farm with a 10 plus acre paddock full of old agriculture machinery. Me tinks a walk with a socket set is in order.
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mtforge

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Reply with quote  #15 
The hardy tools we use at my local blacksmithing group starts with a leaf spring and rolls one end and fits it to your hardy hole. Make it as tall or short as you want. Like this one on youtube  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCKD9NA0pNc 
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confederatemule

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtforge
The hardy tools we use at my local blacksmithing group starts with a leaf spring and rolls one end and fits it to your hardy hole. Make it as tall or short as you want. Like this one on youtube  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCKD9NA0pNc 


I was shocked while watching that video. When he brought out his track anvil I thought it was mine. I have one that I bought at an estate sale. It looks identical to his. Same color and all.

Mule
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