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theengel

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Reply with quote  #1 

I've been using a foot long section of railroad track as an anvil.  Since I have nothing to compare it too, I can only take the word from other blacksmiths that this is making it very difficult for me.  But what can I do?  No cash.

I found another 6 foot section of it, and decided to actually put some effort into it.  I cut off a 2 foot section, and added a steel block I found to the top.  Next, I'm going to try to cut a horn out of the other end.  Lots of work ahead of me.  I'm hoping my miter saw and an angle grinder will do the job.

I'm also thinking about filling in the hollowed out space with lead.  Maybe drill a few holes in the steel so the lead won't break loose once I start hammering on it.

Any suggestions are always appreciated.  Here's a pic of what I have so far (try to ignore the welding job... I only started working with metal a week ago.)

IMG_0561.JPG 



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jmccustomknives

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Reply with quote  #2 
I took a similar piece and flipped it upside down.  Then I welded in a couple of pieces of 3/4" plates boxing the edges.  That was then welded on a scrap iron stand.  The unit wieghed in at around 150lbs and had a 50% rebound.  I loved it for knifemaking.  That large flat surface really was nice to work on.  I built a forklift tine post anvil that was about 300lbs and didn't have room in my shop for both so the lighter one had to go.  I miss it.  002.JPG 

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theengel

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Reply with quote  #3 
Nice hardy hole.
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Hank Rearden

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Reply with quote  #4 
Skip the lead. The rail top also works as a good fuller and take a piece on its end and you'll have another tool to work with.
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theengel

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Reply with quote  #5 
Why not lead?  I would think that weight is weight, as long as it's solidly stuck to the piece.  I have kind of a lot of it and it's easy to melt and pour.
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Hank Rearden

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Reply with quote  #6 
Lead was used for auto body work at one time. It's easy to melt and shape etc. So I can see why that might have an appeal to dress up an ASO cosmetically. Other than that I can't see a real benefit to use it as filler. You're not going to gain a benefit from the added weight plus you will lose useful work area in areas you add it. Lead melts at 621.5°F. This means if you touch it with hot metal going from blue to dark gray, you're going to melt it. Area's on the railroad track can be used as fullers, or swages. Your imagination is the key.  That said it's also dangerous. Consider that a number of years down the road someone might acquire your ASO and decide to clean it up with a grinder or wire wheel. They would be exposed to lead airborne particles.

If you want extra weight try welding steel plate to it. I think it's useable as is.

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theengel

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank Rearden
You're not going to gain a benefit from the added weight .


Why not?  I was always told that RR anvils don't have enough mass to them.  This would add mass.

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jmccustomknives

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theengel


Why not?  I was always told that RR anvils don't have enough mass to them.  This would add mass.


He's probably thinking the lead would be dead weight, kind of like a dead blow hammer.  I think if you boxed the rail in and poured the lead it would probably work as long as the lead couldn't move.  I also think you'd see the added benefit of the rail being quietened down somewhat.

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anvil

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Reply with quote  #9 
The vibration from your hammer blows will break the bond between lead and steel.

For more mass, securely attach your RR track anvil to your stand or stump. No vibration or jumping around rules!

Remember,, we are blacksmiths,,, the KISS principal rules. [wink]
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