"The Practical Blacksmithing, Bladesmithing, Artistic Metal Working & Hobbyist Forum"
Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #1 

This is my most recent anvil. It's a Paragon Soderfor 203 lbs. steel anvil made in Sweden. It's in overall good shape.

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: anvil_truck.png, Views: 223, Size: 342.20 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: abvil_weight.png, Views: 200, Size: 425.59 KB 

__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!

0


Washington

New Member
Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #2 
New Apprentice. Haven't actually done anything yet, but have classes set up with one blacksmith and two schools over the next six months. I am currently thinking I will get a cast steel anvil, over 200 lbs. But, again, I know next to nothing at this point.
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Washington, Welcome to The Iron Forge Fire. The hardest thing for the to find was my first anvil at a good price. Do you know what brand your most interested in? If not I recommend going to the local library to find a book titled "Anvils in America". It has a good description of anvils you're most likely to find. I think the author is named Richard Postman. Here's a link to Anvil in America
__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
Snake Creek Forge

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #4 
I have 9 anvils in my shop.  I forge tools for a living.  My largest anvil is a 700 lb hay budden in pristine condition.  I also have a 450 lb. fisher in my shop, a 350 lb. hay budden, a 325 lb hay budden, a 300 lb peter wright, a 240 lb hay budden, a 50 lb fisher bench anvil, and a 250 lb peter wright with an oversized pritchel hole.  My portable anvil, which I use for demos, is a 150 lb trenton.  Enjoy the pictures

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: 240441_147881085285426_655379_o.jpg, Views: 327, Size: 28.16 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 240441_147881081952093_4377687_o.jpg, Views: 310, Size: 36.65 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: DSCN0391.JPG, Views: 292, Size: 25.81 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: DCP_2682.JPG, Views: 268, Size: 561.44 KB 

__________________
I teach blacksmithing professionally

0
Arrow Head

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #5 
I have been blacksmithing since 1976.  Shortly after that I inherited my great uncles Peter Wright anvil from the farm. It has served me well for for over 35 years.
0
njanvilman

New Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #6 
Mostly Fishers, but have a sampling of other major brands.  Pictures soon.  Too many anvils to count.
__________________
Owner and Curator of the Fisher & Norris Factory Museum. The most complete collection of FISHER products existing, including patterns, anvils, vises, and ephemera.
0
shane

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #7 
Can anyone offer any advise on whether my anvil is worth restoring? It came from a ship building company and was used during wwll for cable splicing and pipe bending. there is not a lot of writing on it, anvil.jpg
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Shane,

It looks like you have a nice fisher anvil. I don't see anything that would prevent you from using it in the picture. To me it's worth keeping and using as is.

To use an analogy. Some people put value in taking a vacation because of the trip. While others are only interested in getting to the destination.   I for one enjoy the trip. So I would enjoy cleaning up what you have.

Are there any cracks or is anything broken? How's the rebound?

 It's hard to tell the size in the picture. How wide is the face of the anvil and how long from the tip of the horn to the edge of the heel?
Is it 400 lbs. or 40 lbs. ?

Thanks for sharing on "The Iron Forge Fire!"

Hank Rearden

__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
shane

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #9 
Hank, thank's for taking the time to respond, the face is 6" wide and it's 35" long. The only marks I can read on it are  "40" and a partial date that looks like "1907". It weighs 407lbs with the stand and it doesn't have any damage to it except the pitting, it was outside for 47 years. I don't know exactly how to conduct a "rebound" test, but when I drop a 1 lbs hammer on it from a bout a foot high it bounces back up about 9", it feels very lively to me.
I love bringing old things back to life again and I need a project right now anyway. Do you think I could do it with a small side grinder, with a wire wheel first and then a grinding wheel? Thanks again, here is another picture. anvil2.jpg  anvil3.jpg  anvil.jpg 

0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Shane,

I would stay away from the grinder. Several issue with using a grinder. First you can create hot spots and that can ruin the temper. Loosing the temper and you increase the possibility of cracking or breaking off chunks of your anvil. The wire wheel would work fine. Another option is to use electrolysis. Google that and you can find many who use it electrolysis to remove rust. I would wait to see how bad the pits are after you remove the rust. If grinding is a must try a belt sander and go easy. If your using the anvil most small pits will work out over time. You should work with hot metal when hitting or shaping metal. Hitting cold metal can also damage your anvil.  
 
Fisher anvils are the quiet anvil. Tool steel was used on the work face and top of the horn. Some anvils are cast wrought iron, some forged or cast steel. When you say it's lively that's a good sign. A dull thud or low bounce could indicate damage. Maybe a hairline crack or air bubbles during the casting process. Can the round plate be removed? I would love to find a nice anvil like your 400 lbs. beast. I just missed a 350 lbs. Fisher last week at a Lancaster PA sale.

Post photos of you restoration. That would be great. I hope to repair a 1860 Fisher (over 150 years old) this spring. 147lbs. It will find a lot more work in the shop

Hank Rearden


__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
shane

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #11 
Hank, I included two more pictures of the surface of the horn and top. The pitting is anvil5.jpg  anvil 4.jpg   1/8" on the horn and lower top, but less then a 1/16" on the very top. I will take your advice and start cleaning it up with a wire wheel and go from there. The cable splicing plate has a 1" x 1' rod on the bottom and it just sits in a hole at the back and can be lifted out. I think I can see where the top 3/8" of the flat portion of the anvil is different from the lower, I see a fine line at the bottom, about 3/8" from the top.is that tool steel surface you mentioned? If I have to sand 1/8" , or even a little more off the top and horn do you think that will be ok?
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #12 
Hi Shane,

I can see the pitting better with the last pictures you posted. I would probably dress the rough pitting as well. Keep in mind that 1/8" off the horn equals a 1/4" in overall width when you add both side to the equation.  Ultimately It's up to you. I guess it depends on what you plan to do with your anvil. The small square area after the horn is the anvil's chipping table. It's used for cutting metal and testing chisels and such. It's normally a softer metal to do those task.  

Something else I wanted to mention to help clean off the rust that has worked well for me. After I clean with a wire wheel I use something like Spray Nine or Purple Power to wash the metal. That helps remove the loose rust that sticks to the metal. Simple Green also works well. I use an old car wash brush and then dry it with a shop towel. 

To preserve the bare metal you can try beeswax mixed with canola oil to make a paste. Heat beeswax slowly and add oil until you get a consistence you like. Another, mixture is one part beeswax, one part turpentine and 1/2 part linseed oil. ((((Be careful)))) when making this: the ingredient's are flammable. Here's a youtube video on the mix.


__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
Kiwi tussock

Scrolling Member
Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #13 
Thumbs up to you Hank.  That's great info for learners like me to.
Cheers.
0
Skarzs the Cave Troll

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #14 
Aside from the two POS ASO's I have, I have only one real anvil: a 100 lb. Hay Budden. Funnily enough, I couldn't figure out what it said on the side for the longest time, and only recently discovered what it was. And I've been seeing the name everywhere. xD xP Preferably I want a heavier one, but as it is, my little getto-shop so easily fills with stuff that I'm not sure I would have room.
__________________
Cave of Skarzs
0
Dustin Stephens

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 214
Reply with quote  #15 

I have a 75 pound kohlswa from sweden, dont know the year as there is no numbers all all on the thing. This is my first real anvil and I love it.  Drove 6 1/2ish hrs to get it.  Traded an old sks rifle for it

0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #16 
Hey Cave Troll, 100 lbs. sounds good to me. and it's funny how quickly you run out of room. I can hardly walk in my garage any more. I only have a path to the garage door from inside. That's way I told the wife the driveway was mine as well as the garage. My diet is going well.
__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #17 
Hey Dustin Stephens, sounds like a great deal based on the items traded. 6 1/2 hour drive plus Old SKS for and anvil. Would have loved being a fly on the wall at the horse trade. I bought my Soderfor and offered to buy his SKS. Could only afford the  anvil. Watch those State lines.


__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
jmccustomknives

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 946
Reply with quote  #18 
I have the pleasure of hosting 2 anvils in my shop.  I say "hosting" as they will outlast me.  My first was a 200lb Fisher that took me 4 1/2 years to find.  Up till then I worked on a RR track anvil.  The second found me, a 120lb Eveson.  If you've never heard of one, don't feel bad.  It's an English anvil circa 1870 and I've only found about 8 examples in the US.

Since I'm a knifemaker I also have a post anvil I made from some Forklift tines.  It's around 300lbs.

__________________

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

0
Dustin Stephens

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 214
Reply with quote  #19 
Ha, yeah Hank, I checked and double checked with my buddy who really likes doughnuts about the state line ordeal, good to go
0
Yesteryear Forge

Avatar / Picture

Fullering Member
Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #20 
This is mine
Its a Refflinghaus 
1245 lbs.
 

003.JPG


__________________
Give out before you give up - if it was easy anybody could do it
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #21 
Dang............. Dang and a fly press in the back ground double dang again.
__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
jmccustomknives

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 946
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yesteryear Forge
This is mine
Its a Refflinghaus 
1245 lbs.
 

003.JPG


[love]

__________________

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

0
Skarzs the Cave Troll

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #23 
That emoticon, tho.

I am jealous. Very jealous. I only have a 100# Hay Budden.
Can't say I'm a huge fan of Refflinghaus anvils, though. Just a fan of huge anvils.

__________________
Cave of Skarzs
0
Yesteryear Forge

Avatar / Picture

Fullering Member
Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #24 
I have owned most every brand and size anvil that was ever made and I believe the Refflinghaus is THE best.
I actually have two - The big shop anvil and a 220 lb. one that I use for demos

__________________
Give out before you give up - if it was easy anybody could do it
0
Skarzs the Cave Troll

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #25 
It's interesting that they're one of the very few companies that make new anvils.
__________________
Cave of Skarzs
0
Yesteryear Forge

Avatar / Picture

Fullering Member
Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #26 
Actually there are a lot of anvil manufacturers out there
Vaughn Brooks
Habermann
Euroanvil
Big Blu
Peddinghaus
Delta
TFS
Emerson
Refflinghaus
Jymn Hoffman
Rat Hole
Ozark pattern by Tom Clark
Nimba
And probably 10 or so more lesser known Makers

__________________
Give out before you give up - if it was easy anybody could do it
0
Skarzs the Cave Troll

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #27 
More than I thought. Still, though, none of them are like those old ones.
One make I really like are the Rhino Anvils sold by a guy in Idaho. Air hardened steel. Comes in two sizes. That's gonna be the anvil I'm gonna get eventually. (I've used them, and I can vouch for the quality. Great rebound, awesome ring. . .)

__________________
Cave of Skarzs
0
Porterboy

Scrolling Member
Registered:
Posts: 41
Reply with quote  #28 
Holy crap what a setup very nice
0
Dvilhauer

New Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #29 
Any info on this is greatly appreciated. I found it in a barn in Northern California when purchasing a cutting torch set. I did a bit a research and found the brand is good but why is it so small? (51.6 lbs on a bathroom scale) I will never use it properly and would love to sell it to someone that will use if for what it is intended for.  Price??  Shoot me an offer I can't refuse. Shipping available but obviously will be pricey.

  IMG_0212.JPG

  IMG_0213.JPG

  IMG_0216.JPG  IMG_0214.JPG

0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #30 
Looks like a nice anvil you have there. Perfect for hammer-ins or a traveling smith.

Peter wright made good anvils. If I remember correctly Peter Wright was required to and added Patented and made in England in 1910. So that might help you date this anvil. There is a book by Robert Postman? Anvils in America that has better detail. That should sell easily. Are you willing to ship it?

0-1-24 is stone weight measurements. click here for explanation on stone weight

__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
Dvilhauer

New Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #31 
Thanks for the fast reply and info. yes I would be willing to ship it. I have Fed. Ex, USPS , and UPS close to my house. I would just need a zip code  I think for shipping cost.  Like I said in my original post, I would love to see this get used for what it was intended. I am a carpenter by trade and a welding student. I want to get a welding shop opened up eventually, but I feel this needs to go to a tradesman that will use it correctly. Thanks again for the speedy reply. If you know anyone that might me interested and want to contact me directly my email is douglas.vilhauer@gmail.com
[thumb][thumb][thumb]

0
Skarzs the Cave Troll

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #32 
A "good", or should I say common, price per pound nowadays is around $3/lbs., not to say that whoever bought it wouldn't be eternally grateful for it to be a little cheaper. [wink] So about $150. I personally would enjoy having a little guy like that, though I'm on the West Coast. . .

Or you can raise the price to $400+ because it's a Peter Wright, a collectible, an antique, and you want to take advantage of the huge demand for anvils.[sneaky] 
(Seriously. . . I saw a listing for a 100 pound Hay Budden for $1100. That's just absolutely unreasonable.)

__________________
Cave of Skarzs
0
Scrambler82

Avatar / Picture

Journal Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #33 
Thats nice !

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yesteryear Forge
This is mine
Its a Refflinghaus 
1245 lbs.
 

003.JPG

__________________
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
0
Scrambler82

Avatar / Picture

Journal Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #34 
162 lb, Peter Wright, not in bad shape.
Estimate manufacturing date:  1885 - 1910, there is no "England" in the side markings.
Made a new stand for this one.


20170503_084636_1503844137133_resized.jpg   

Anvil number two is a 108 lb, Vulcan 10, my first Anvil, purchased from a Pawn Shop closer to LA, and not the one on TV, thats in Nevada.
I know it is a cast iron tool with a thin steel plate but the price was really good and I didn't have any anvil shaped objects around the shop.
I was very surprised at the condition, looks like it had never had a piece of steel or hammer laid to it !
The paint will be removed sooner than later but for now it is OK !
I don't use this for Hot Steel, when I got the PW this little girl was moved to the Gun Bench, I will make a couple of Hardie Tools for pushing pins, tweaking and straightening a thin piece or two for a better fit, and the mass of metal you need once in a while to help something move.
She is doing her job very well, there is always a stuck pin or nut and the mass weight helps a lot !


IMG_2453.JPG 

I was very lucky to find these Anvils close to home in SoCal, also lucky to find the small one first because if I had the larger PW first I may not have purchased the Vulcan.  I did and have a great Anvil for the Gun Bench.

Thks for reading...


__________________
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
0
Hank Rearden

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 985
Reply with quote  #35 
Nice PW. I like the banding as well.
__________________
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
0
Marc

Avatar / Picture

Swageing Member
Registered:
Posts: 119
Reply with quote  #36 
I collected a few anvils over the years.
Started with a cast steel farrier's anvil made in Queensland Australia by a now defunct foundry called Doug Flat.
When it arrived I noticed a few faults in the cast. I told them about it and they sent me another one ... so started with two 40 kilos anvil.

Next up was a nice Kohlswa I bought for a song on e-bay. It weights at just 20 lb and it's a pocket size anvil you can take camping with you in a back pack if you wanted.

I found my next anvil, left behind at a market place after closing hours. Literally fell off the back of a truck. It is a sample anvil, London pattern, no brand on it and is about 4" long 3" high and 1" wide and has no practical use whatsoever. 

Next one bought on Gumtree is a 280 lb Peter Wright. Paid well under $3 a lb and it came with a story. The anvil was in a very expensive Sydney Suburb and the owner was clearly not a blacksmith, looked more like a high stakes corporate player. We loaded the anvil in my 4wd and I asked how did he came to have this anvil. He said that a friend of the family "a very old man" had asked him to "get rid of this anvil for me". He was 15 at the time and put the anvil in the family garage, covered it with a tarp and kept it there until now. He was around 60 when we met. The anvil has a name and surname written on it with a stick welder. A google search revealed hundreds of hits since it is a common name. It is in very good nick and clearly had an easy life. only a couple of minor chips, the rest is very good for a 100 years old tool.
My most recent purchase yet by no means the last one if I have my way, is another PW this time a 480 lb but sadly with no story attached. This one has had a harder life. The face is in general good nick, a few chips on the edge, but the cutting table and the start of the horn have a lot of chisel marks and the horn has a bit of a sway with lots of chisel cuts. Does not bother me, the chisel cuts may close up with use.
If I buy another one it will have to be a southern German pattern with a shelf, possibly a Reffi or Peddinghaus. I like the smooth transition from horn to face.
 



__________________
It is in the character of very few men, to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. 
Aeschylus
 
0
Scrambler82

Avatar / Picture

Journal Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #37 
Marc,

What is the shelf used for ? You stated, "If I buy another one it will have to be a southern German pattern with a shelf, possibly a Reffi or Peddinghaus. I like the smooth transition from horn to face".

I have seen the Up Setter Blocks on the base of the German Anvils and understand (basically) about upsetting, and I've seen the shelf you mentioned but I have no idea why the shelf was there originally.

If it was on my PW I would use it for edge shaping and bending metal but the original purpose... I will have to look that one up too !

__________________
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
0
Marc

Avatar / Picture

Swageing Member
Registered:
Posts: 119
Reply with quote  #38 
Interesting you ask. People either love the shelf or hate it. 
I only ever made decorative/architectural stuff never knifes or tools, and for that the shelf is a practical addition to the anvil to start a scroll. 
My first job in the smithy was to cold texture flat bar with a hammer full of holes, and my second job, once I could be trusted with using the forge,  was to make the start of the scroll for the master to twist it on a jig and mount it on the job.
Here is Hofi doing exactly that.


__________________
It is in the character of very few men, to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. 
Aeschylus
 
0
Scrambler82

Avatar / Picture

Journal Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #39 

Its a Refflinghaus 

[image]
/QUOTE]

YF,

Was wondering what you made your Tool Rack out of, the one around the Anvil Stand ?

I'm thinking on a Rack now but up in the air.

Thanks

__________________
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
0
Yves

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #40 
Ridgid (Peddinghaus) 125 kg (275 lbs). 

I work hoping that one day I will need a 1245 lbs anvil. In the meantime, like others here, I discovered that jealousy is green …


DSC02352.jpg


__________________
The alternative to getting old is not interesting.
0
Marc

Avatar / Picture

Swageing Member
Registered:
Posts: 119
Reply with quote  #41 
Yes, big anvils have a wow factor, but for practical purpose ... I am not sure I want a very big anvil. I have two PW, one is 280 lb the other is 480 lb. I use the 280 a lot more. It just feels right ... not sure what it is, I would probably never go near a 1000 lb anvil unless it is way low and I am using a sledge hammer. 
__________________
It is in the character of very few men, to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. 
Aeschylus
 
0
Adam A

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #42 
I was given what I believe is a Fisher 700 dated 1941.  It also has a "US Property" tag on it.  This is really too large for anything i'd do, is there any demand for these large anvils?
0
jmccustomknives

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 946
Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam A
I was given what I believe is a Fisher 700 dated 1941.  It also has a "US Property" tag on it.  This is really too large for anything i'd do, is there any demand for these large anvils?

Demand, yes.  High demand.  An anvil like that will bring a premium.  I wish I could buy it.  lol.  My Fisher is a 200lber and is marked the same way.  The government probably sold them off as surplus after the war.  As far as it goes, a guy had a 400lb Fisher at the last smith's meeting and wanted $1800 for it.  I think that one could bring much more.


__________________

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

0
Adam A

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #44 
Thanks jmc.  Any guidance as to what's a fair asking price?  I would like a fair price for buyer, and myself.   I want to see it go to someone who can appreciate it.
0
Marc

Avatar / Picture

Swageing Member
Registered:
Posts: 119
Reply with quote  #45 
Price can vary a lot with location in the US. That size anvil would probably sell for $5000 in Australia and certainly $3-4000 in some places in the US. Just post it on e-bay and ask a ridiculous price, sit back and see what comes. 
__________________
It is in the character of very few men, to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. 
Aeschylus
 
0
Adam A

Drifting Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #46 
Thanks Marc, that's more than I expected.  I think i'm going to try listing it locally for 3k, and see what happens.  If no bites, then Ebay.  Thanks for the help, and info guys.
0
Marc

Avatar / Picture

Swageing Member
Registered:
Posts: 119
Reply with quote  #47 
I would post it for $5999 with a note that it is a special anvil for making swords and large knives, they practically make themselves on it ...  [cool]
__________________
It is in the character of very few men, to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. 
Aeschylus
 
0
theengel

Journal Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #48 
I just look at those pics wishfully and sink into my fantasy world.
__________________
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
0
Skarzs the Cave Troll

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #49 
Holy moly, dude, that is a hecking awesome anvil! Hope it finds a good home. Fishers are awesome.
__________________
Cave of Skarzs
0
Marc

Avatar / Picture

Swageing Member
Registered:
Posts: 119
Reply with quote  #50 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam A
I was given what I believe is a Fisher 700 dated 1941.  It also has a "US Property" tag on it.  This is really too large for anything i'd do, is there any demand for these large anvils?


Hi Adam ... if you are still around, give this guy a call, he is the Fisher expert and works in the Fisher museum. Check him out

https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/42155-new-700-lb-fisher-anvil/

__________________
It is in the character of very few men, to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. 
Aeschylus
 
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.