zbehunin
I am in the process of designing a series of foundries but cant find a cheap material that I can buy to make it withstand iron melting temperatures. I would prefer a recipe that I can use to create a large amount of home made firebricks that can withstand at least 2900 degrees Fahrenheit. Preferably closer to 3500 but as far as I am aware there is not anything that can do that.

Thanks to all!
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jmccustomknives
Look at some RAM, it's a plastic refractory used to line forge burners.  It's not an insulator, so it should be used with an appropriate kaowool or soft firebrick.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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zbehunin
Where is somewhere that I can find that at and how much am I looking at for it? When I search that online I just find computer RAM.
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zbehunin
Through my research online I have found a recipe to make the walls and floor out of but I don't know how to tell what kind of temperatures it will withstand. What happens when they are heated too much?

The recipe I found is as follows:

1 part by volume of Perlite (NOT VERMICULITE)
2 part by volume of Fire Clay (Refractory Clay)
1 part by volume of Sand (Silica, as pure as possible)
1 part by volume of Ash (Finely Ground)
1 part by volume of Portland Cement (Mason's Cement Doesn't Work/ Nor does Concrete)

Allow for MULTIPLE days to dry and then SLOWLY heat to final temperature!


I copied that from another forum but I cant find anything on maximum temperature. If it helps I also have another handful of recipes that I have copied but they are for the most part fairly similar.

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jmccustomknives
I'm not an expert on that sort of stuff.  Metelmelt is into the foundry thing, lets see if he can add anything.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Metalmelt
I gave up on homebrew refractory. I use a commercial high temp refractory, Mt. Savage Superheatcrete 32. It will take 3200F. I have a 1" liner in my large furnace and it shows no melting from Iron. 
Refractory usually fails in one of two ways. It either melts like glass and everything is stuck together or it cracks and flakes, basically turns back into dust. I just built a small furnace with fireclay, Alumina, sand and Magnesia. It didn't bind right or hold together when heated. It just keeps crumbling away.
Commercial refractory is expensive, and all the components to make your own is expensive. Commercial works great, homebrew might fail and probably will. 

Here are some rammable plastics. The ram 90 has 90% Alumina and will take 3300F plus. It has the recipe but I sure don't know what holds it together. 150 pounds per cubic foot. I haven't checked prices lately, Used to be about $1.20 per pound, might be twice that now. ??
http://mtsavage.com/ProductInformation/ProductLines/Plastics/tabid/124/Default.aspx
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zbehunin
I unfortunately cannot afford that right now as I am still just getting into the hobby, what is the highest temperature that I should be able to reach with a homemade mix?
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Hank Rearden
Here's a link to how I mixed up my batch.

http://www.theironforgefire.com/post/help-on-claying-a-forge-6765263?highlight=clay+forge&pid=1286708643

I got everything at a masonry supply except the pearlite. That I got at Ace Hardware.

I have one issue that might have been caused by the Borax eating the brick or. The bricks closest to the fire pot from formed a thin coat of glass from the heat of the fire. If the latter is true it may indicate to much sand. Anyway I still use it as is after pulling away the glass film. 
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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zbehunin
I have a few questions about that forge, how hot were you getting it when you got the layer of glass and does that form every time or only the once?
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Metalmelt
I have tried some quick crete mix, the fast setting type. It has some alumina in it. I used a screen to sift out the rocks and gravel. I didn't use enough and it didn't hold up. You want to stay on a small amount of portland cement. You can have a dangerous steam explosion from the chemically bonded water that it has. I'm not sure of numbers but I don't think I would go more than 20 percent. Other things you can try are  Diatomaceous Earth, small amounts of lime and magnesia.
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zbehunin
I have found a product called Kast-o-lite 30 that fits the needs that I am looking for but I cant find it anywhere near salt lake city utah, If it is in northern utah I am willing to drive to get it but I cant find any online or physical retailers. Does anyone know of anywhere that I can find this or a similar alternative with equal or better heat resistance?
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Metalmelt
http://www.ceramicsupplyusa.com/refractories/

You could check out these guys, they're in Salt Lake City.

http://www.utah-refractories-corp.com/

Another place but not much info.
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zbehunin
it is almost looking Like buying the stuff from ebay is the cheapest route, although not by much

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