BigWooly
Hello all. I've been lurking for awhile, but this is my first post so forgive me if I'm on a bit of a learning curve. I'm self admittedly tech challenged so here I go. 
  Finally in a spot where I can re-ignight my metal tinkering and have pulled together all my old "anvils" and a few recent scrapyard finds. Now I'm looking for input, ideas, and mostly actual working knowledge on how to most effectively put them to use.
  My main area of starting projects will be some basic knives, bbq tools, and maybe some decorative baubles to weld on our various gates. (Scrolls, leaves, mangled flowers, things in this vein). Not sure if that really matters but more info can't hurt, right?
  My current selection of anvil type items to bang on consists of 2x 40lb steel dumbbells, 3x 2ft sections of light gauge rail, 3x 2x10x18ish mild steel counter balances (from an older than me dozer), and my crowning jewel (I think) approx 2ft of the working tip from a large hydraulic breaker. 4in diameter round 2ft long with a large chisel point on one end. 
  My current thoughts are to weld the counter balances together to make a large striking anvil so as to provide some forgiveness while I work on my striking accuracy.  Probably set up on end to provide a 6in wide striking surface. 
  Second, cut the handle off one of the dumbbells, and weld the lobes together for a 40ish lb chunk of harder steel after my accuracy game has come along. 
  My biggest wonder (I think) is how to best use the breaker tip? Originally i had thought to strap it down on its side to use as a horn, but I'm starting to wonder if I'd be better served to mount it in a stump so i can swap ends. Using the cut end as a round flat striking surface, or flipped over as a giant cutting tool. I know it's better to strike over the mass of the anvil but I'd hate to waste the closest thing to a horn I've got just to have another flat surface to whack things on. 
  Any direction would be greatly appreciated. If there's any information i left out please let me know. Typing this on my phone so I'm already feeling like I'm rambling.  I'll try to post some pictures this evening after work if that would help in any way. 
  Thanks in advance, and more importantly, thanks for all the valuable insight I've gained from lurking around for the last few months. 
Joseph. 
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Mike Westbrook
Welcome to the forum I think your right about the breaker point don't mess that up the long round side would work like a horn for tapering and you can always have a machine shop turn it into a cone mandrel in the future and I'm sure it's at least 1055 or harder the other good thought is mass it makes whatever your surface is work better my 180 lb anvil is seated on a steel plate bedded on 260 lbs compacted sand inside a stand all that mass works to keep it very solid and the sand deadens the ring with all that said welding up parts is a bit of a chore if you just stack parts and weld around them they will still act as separate peices because they are not one (kinda dead and springy ) the only good way is to place a ball bearing between the two peices leaving a gap big enough for a welding rod and build your way out to the edges then both peices will be one which takes lots and lots of time and welding and you will still have something you probably aren't in love with you can make and add mass with the peices you have I would just favor saving for an anvil they are hard to find no doubt but even a small anvil on the right base can feel like a larger one and you will have the pleasure of the Hardy and pritchel holes I spend alot of time on Hardy tools and would miss the option greatly don't be afraid of a used anvil as long as it's not cracked most of the surfaces can be cleaned up i only use a small section of sharp square edge the rest is rounded and tapered for drawing out tapers and starting scrolls and rings .....happy hammering 
Facebook (South mountain metal works)
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jmccustomknives
An anvil needs two things, mass and hardness.  The mass is needed to counter the hammers force and at minimum is around a 20 to 1 ratio with 40 to 1 being optimal.  The second part is the anvil needs to be hard enough to reflect the energy from the hammer strike, this is sometimes referred to as rebound.  With that being said a lot of things can be used as a makeshift anvil, some work well.  Avoid anything cast iron as they are brittle.  For knives a square top works most excellent.  keep us up to date on your progress.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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BigWooly
Thank you for the input. Sincerely. 
  Unfortunately, any extra moneys for the foreseeable future are already allocated to goat production so I've got to work with what I can get my hands on.  But a legit anvil is most definitely holding 3-4 spots on the ol' bucket list. 
  Considering the dead feel of welded plates, would I possibly be better off laying one of the counter weights on its side as a striking "anvil", in the meantime to schwack some metal and build my arm up?  I've hit the ground a few times (when I bounced more than went splat) and have some arthritis action in my good shoulder. Gonna need to build that up slow n steady. They are 75lbs each but I figure that doesn't mean much if its spread out the wrong way. I appreciate the concept of learning the right way once.  But, I also know I'm a lazy slug that does better if I get a start and barrel ass on through rather than wait to do it just perfect the first time. I'll get there in my own time. 
  I'll try to take some pictures tomorrow morning.  Planning to mount it all to a stand made from 2x4's screwed and glued, wrapped with metal strap (top n bottom), and turned up on end.  2x4's are the most uniform piece of lumber around my parts.  4x4's and larger are trash around here. 
  Thought about a sand filled base but want to see how well my tie down method works before sacrificing tie down strength due to sand core. (If that makes sense) At this point leaning towards simi pre-formed hot 1" strap with lag bolts screwed down tight. 
  I'm I generally in the right train of thought? Any glaring items I'm missing?  And again, a huge sincere thank you for the replys and information. 
Wooly
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Mike Westbrook
Wooly I had one other thought you could take what you feel is your best peice weld it to a section of large pipe or well casing fill it with high strength cement and sink it in the ground that should make for a heavy solid post anvil of sorts that might actually might be fairly decent just a thought 
Facebook (South mountain metal works)
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anvil
You are overthinking this puppy. Starting with no experience take it one step at a time. What you need is a flat surface firmly mounted to some sort of a stand, wood or metal, and this stand firmly connected to the ground. 

Leave all the rest alone. As you gain experience you will figure out uses for all the rest.

Your next priority should be a good post vice. Note a post vice, not a machinist vice.

I'm assuming you have some semblance of a forge.

This triad, and, of course, a hammer are the primary tools of our craft. 

Most important, start beating hot iron soonest and often.
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BigWooly
Tweaked my back this weekend so I'm stuck looking and thinking but here's a pic of my 20190205_084343.jpg "aso's". Just sitting around looking pretty, waiting to be banged on. 
While I'm on the mend, what books or other websites would y'all recommend for a newbie metal schwacker?  Trying to learn wherever I can. 
Wooly
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Scrambler82
I shouldn't even comment on your ideas because I don't have enough experience BUT... looking at your picture and reading what you posted, I think I would use the Heaviest Railroad Track, with the Weight Plate under it and secured in a wooden frame.
Make sure if using wood, stand each piece on end, not flat on the 4" side, glue and screw.

If you make a good solid stand out of wood it should work, once you added the weight plate it will add mass to the overall package, you might consider the stand being the size of the weight.   Then secure the track !
There is no reason that it can't work.


[20190205_084343] 
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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bigphotog
Railroad track seems to be the go to for beginners.
I’ve never used one but one of the constants I have read is that of the flex because of the thinner center. But I’ve seen a lot of mods where fillers have been made from hardwood. This seems like it might work and if anything it would help quiet it down a bit
I went a different route... I found a small forged anvil that was close to the rail dementions and also made a striking plate for larger items.
  29DB50FD-1511-48D2-A47A-EA3CEF7A60C3.jpeg  18DE348C-718A-4626-8668-81A6034413DF.jpeg  E04EA510-8D9E-4E7F-8761-C6B6801DF2D9.jpeg 
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Scrambler82
The Striking Plate is nice, looks good too !

Can we get more pictures of the Anvil, side views and end views.

Thanks
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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bigphotog
6325350E-872B-4657-BCC3-0E1BC746B191.jpegIt was a good Christmas 😎0CFC2139-3632-4669-AF95-9A1F6963C3BF.jpeg  65E415C0-183E-4806-88B1-4DE5EBF637E5.jpeg  A00FF901-1B7F-463A-98E4-AE2918625009.jpeg  B48EC649-D306-44C2-87BA-8102FF7C9A03.jpeg  6F152362-5248-454D-B02D-9FA73B6B7696.jpeg 
I found this small anvil while on a road trip with my wife but didn’t buy it...
Unknown to me my wife did and hid it then gave it to me for Christmas. I made the bace out of scrap sections of  poupular 4x4s. They have been glued and bolted together. 
its a small version of one of the big ones we had in Idaho when I was growing up. 
It has a hardened striking surface forge welded to a cast base. So far it’s holding up. I’m returning to the forge after being away for over 30 years. I’ve also started making knifes.
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bigphotog
BigWooly, one thought on the dumbbells. One could be made into a “stump”anvil by cutting off one end grinding a taper to the handle and grind flat and polish the top. Then find a good stump, drill a pilot hole and drive the dumbbell into it. I could be wrong but it might work...it would be like a cast anvil. 
Just a thought.
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bigphotog
I have a photo of a additional way to use  one of the narrow glade rails. It’s not mine so I can’t post it. In the photo the rail was mounted vertically on the end of 47D994C9-0AD1-40B9-8DF0-4261CF6C72EE.jpeg 
a Stand like the one I made for my striking plate. They had a section of wood under the bottom end and would use the top end as the striking surface... I’d suggest stacking and bolting the 2x4s like I did my scraps mounting the longest rail vertical on the end then the rail that’s shaped to a point on top horizontal. Then make a second stand out of 2x4s for the tractor weight.
that would give you several striking surfaces to work with....
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Scrambler82
OK, more pics, thx.
When I saw the Hammer next to the Anvil I wondered is that a large hammer or a little Anvil, just how big is that anvil ?

[65E415C0-183E-4806-88B1-4DE5EBF637E5] 

I am not saying good or bad here... just thought it was funny, maybe my question should have been what size it that hammer ?

Like the Tool Racks, did you build them ?

That Anvil was a great gift from the wife, I don't even mention my Blacksmithing needs to the wife, would go in one ear and out the other.

Ltr
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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bigphotog
It is a small anvil, but I can move Metal on it😊 I was going to go the rail road rail route  
on my journey back to the forge and this is the same size as most rail anvils and it was a gift.I took a two day class as a refresher  and I’ve built my first gas forge from scratch and it didn’t blow up in my face. I will move on to a larger anvil but I’m on my way...
  
 Made from leftover fire bricks from a friends wood fired oven, scrap gas plumbing parts and a used harbor freight tool stand 
3B0226F2-9958-4670-8775-3F5861512578.jpeg 03680A7C-A990-4D11-971C-CE1CB5992245.jpeg   
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bigphotog
Woolly, I apologize. We’ve kinda hi jacked your thread. Sorry but my intention was that some of my photos might give you a few ideas... I’m like you in that I’m just beginning my journey and I have a budget so  I just can’t go out and slap down a bunch of cash for a new big anvil or a lot of tools.... So I like to make them out of raw materials and scraps or find cast offs and repurpose or refurbish them or trade for what I need.
Good luck on your journey.
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BigWooly
Absolutely no apology needed. Your photos have done exactly that. Goat kidding season has hi jacked my free time here of late and following the conversation and pictures has kept my mind churning. Thank you everyone who has posted. Anything to squeeze a little more creative juice out of my feeble brain! At some point I'll get some progress made and post some more pictures. 👍
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bigphotog
Wooly, here is the photo of a way to use a rail as a anvil... the idea is it gives you a solid  flat striking surface that’s better than than the rounded top of the rail.  FD00097A-C126-4D02-B645-20483070FC31.jpeg 
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Marc
bigphotog wrote:
Wooly, here is the photo of a way to use a rail as a anvil... the idea is it gives you a solid  flat striking surface that’s better than than the rounded top of the rail.    


The debates over railroad anvils tends to end in photos like this of a vertically mounted rail. Sure it will give better mass under the hammer and feel solid, but at a high price ... negligible surface and even some knuckle danger. 

The reality is that anvils are not meant to be universal and each size has a purpose or they would be all the same size. 
Just like hammers a small anvil is for small objects and a large one ... well obviously for big stuff. 
Sure I can cut leafs from 1/16" sheet metal on a 500 pound anvil and I can do the same on a rail be it vertical or horizontal. Actually I would prefer to cut on the horizontal rail but taht is just me. 
When it comes to forging though ... size matters. The size of the job and the size of the anvil and the size of the hammer all have to be in harmony. 
Personally I would hate to work on a vertical rail. it gives me the shivers to think what will happen if I miss the puny surface. 

Then again, if you cut the web and the foot of the rail lower and let the head stick out, then grind it round, you have the perfect little anvil to make copper vessels. 
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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anvil
I agree with Marc.  About every time you work something on the anvil, the last step is to flatten/level/straighten.  You have far more surface to do this when it is not vertical. With a little grinder work its worth the time.  And, as above, the safety issue tells me to not have it in the vertical.
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Marc
i will go on a limb here and believe me, I have no intention to be nothing but helpful. 

Blacksmithing is a trade. Not a complicated trade, a very primitive trade, one that is almost forgotten, and one that can be learned with someone more experienced, or by yourself with a lot of pain.
Best thing is to find a blacksmith association near you.

As for stuff you need, you need a collection of hammers, a collection of tongs, a forge, a pedestal vice and ... yes you need that too, something to hammer on. 
You also need protective gear, big pedestal drill, punches, a welder, tap, dies, hardie tools, a large collection of chisels and much more, and then fuel for the forge, steel for your projects ... and with all of the above you are still not able to make a knife, because you need a couple of barrow full of grinding gear, not to mention tempering oven, steel of known quality and more, like bandsaw or cold saw or drop saw etc ... never ending.

i say all this just to show that the anvil, as much as it is glamorous and sought after and the reason prices have gone so high, is but one of the tools that are essential. If you can find an old counterbalance from a tractor, but a large and square one, your onto something. otherwise go to your local steel merchant and ask for the largest piece of shaft off cut they have, ready for the scrap heap. 
If everything else fails, buy a china made ASO from Amazon or Ebay.
Yes, one of those frown upon horrible looking soft pieces of ... something. 

You can forge on them and I did for a few years when I was 15. After two years it looked like a giant had pushed it in with his thumb, it had a million chisel and hammer marks ... but it served me to forge a lot of decorative stuff we use to make. For what they are worth, you can use it as door stop and graduate to a better one, like a farrier anvil for example.

To get started in a trade you need tools. Tools cost money. There is no escaping that reality. You can improvise to a point, sure. Ask around, there is bound to be someone that has blacksmithing tools rusting on the floor of their garage ... and in my opinion, it will be much harder to find on line, then door knocking.
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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Scrambler82
bigphotog wrote:
Wooly, here is the photo of a way to use a rail as a anvil... the idea is it gives you a solid  flat striking surface that’s better than than the rounded top of the rail.  FD00097A-C126-4D02-B645-20483070FC31.jpeg 


A little late but I like it, the design is functional, additional work area, space for a rack or two, and a good mount at the bottom and the Railroad Spikes holding the Rail to the block, NICE !  Great Work !
AND if more area is needed you can flip it !

I am also I fan of using scrap pieces of 2x12s, on end !

How does it move hot steel ?
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Mike Bukraba
I'd suggest that as far as your projects go YouTube I'd your best friend as there might be ways of doing the same or similar things in a different way with not much more than a flat surface and the rods of your Dumbbells.  Sorry I'm chiming in a little bit late!
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Marc wrote:
As for stuff you need, you need a collection of hammers, a collection of tongs, a forge, a pedestal vice and ... yes you need that too, something to hammer on. 
You also need protective gear, big pedestal drill, punches, a welder, tap, dies, hardie tools, a large collection of chisels and much more, and then fuel for the forge, steel for your projects ... and with all of the above you are still not able to make a knife, because you need a couple of barrow full of grinding gear, not to mention tempering oven, steel of known quality and more, like bandsaw or cold saw or drop saw etc ... never ending.
Hey, Marc! Not trying to diss your advice here or anything, and maybe I''m misunderstanding what you're trying to get across here, but you don't "need" all of that stuff before you are able to make a knife- If all that was necessary before even thinking about making a knife, there would be a lot fewer beginning knifemakers out there. Obviously to forge a knife an anvil and forge are necessary, and a variety of hammers, tongs, and chisels are good to have, but a post vise can be supplemented by a good, properly mounted bench vise, a small drill press will be good for most projects, a welding machine can come in handy but arguably may not be necessary, a tempering oven is accurate, but not necessary, and a drop/cold saw can be replaced with other forms of cutting. 
Once again, I may be misunderstanding, but if I were a beginner, being told I needed all that stuff would discourage and overwhelm me- I didn't have the money, space, or availability to get a lot of that stuff, and I still don't, but the tools don't make the maker, as much as they might help them make better products. 
The tools required can also change when one considers the amount and manner of work the person is doing. It sucks to get a tool for one project then find what you mostly do has no use for that tool.
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BigWooly
Thanks again all for the input. Sorry I've been on hiatus for a bit but still slowly working my way to the goal. As usual life hasn't been the most helpful with my free time but I'm too hardheaded to quit. 
  I've just about got my stand made up waiting on glue to dry right now. Then finish planing the sides and lag the pieces together. Went 2x4 on end, screwed and glued into 4 "slabs". Planed the sides of the slabs, next wrap it all with 1" strap and lag bolt it all in to one large block.  
  Think I've decided to use one of the plates as a striking surface, cut one dumbbell into a post anvil, and mount the rock breaker tip horizontally for a makeshift horn.  If I do it right I should be able to try it all out on the base in different configurations until I find what works best for my purposes. 
  I'm slowly getting various tools together so I at least have enough to get a solid start when it's all ready to go. There's always a better widget out there but that'll come when time and money allows.
  Also, Essential Craftsman, I believe, is running a second round of his intro to blacksmithing course in September. Gonna sign up for that to add to my knowledge base and I should be well on my way. 
  If I can get to where I can put together some basic latches, hinges, and decorative handles I'll be set. Not to interested in knives at the moment. I know I'll get there but I've already got chingles of knives and would like to start on useful things for around my house and where I work.
  Again, thanks for ALL of the input! Keep it coming. I'll get it all put together at some point. 
Wooly
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Marc
Hey, Marc! Not trying to diss your advice here or anything, and maybe I''m misunderstanding what you're trying to get across here, but you don't "need" all of that stuff before you are able to make a knife-


Yes Skarzs, that is self evident (or so I thought 🙂 ) in the next 3 paragraph of the post you quoted. 
When the topic of blacksmithing beginnings comes up, and the cost or scarcity of tools is mentioned, usually someone posts those videos of Africa or somewhere else where they make a subsistence living working crouching down in the dirt, on a fire pit pumping a bellow with one foot whilst hammering on a rock.  I try to stay clear of those videos because I can not reconcile the fact that people need to work like that to be able to eat. Another epic example of improvisation when it comes to metal work, is the scrapping of ships in Bangladesh. Absolutely mind boggling. 

But back to our beginner blacksmith or bladesmith in search of an improvised anvil. 
Trade or hobby needs some money for tools. Fact. 
Different objects you want to forge, require different tools. Fact. 

When it comes to anvils, you can improvise to a point. A rail is probably the most common object used instead of an anvil ... and in my opinion the least useful. 
You can do much worse than buying a cheap ASO off amazon or ebay for whatever they go for, that is a 1/4 of the price of a good anvil ... yet you end up with an anvil that will serve you for a shorter period of time than a Peter wright or a Refflinghaus, sure, but by the time you beat your ASO out of shape, you will have learned what you want to make, and have the money hopefully to buy better tools. 

I have read many dozen of post by newcomers who agonize over the need for an anvil they can not find. The anvil market is red hot all over the world due to new people interested in a trade that was almost forgotten for half a century, and that was resurrected mainly thanks to a poorly conceived TV show portraying edited segments of the making of knifes in a race against the clock. The idea of making a knife in a predetermined time frame, borrowed from cooking shows is so stupid that it deserves no further comments ... yet it ignited a resurrection in blacksmithing that is most welcome.
I would have liked that the resurrection had been in the blacksmithing side of things rather than blade smithing only, but ... one can not have all his own way 🙂 

For those who are starting to build their workshop, be it hobby or trade, I suggest to 

A) Join the local blacksmithing association or make friends with the local blacksmith.

B) visit second hand markets for tools and anvil, look up gumtree and craigslist and ebay sure, but rely more on word of mouth. Tell everyone you are after blacksmithing tools and anvil. There is bound to be a forgotten anvil under a bench in a garage within 10 km from where you live. May be more than one. 

C) if everything fails in relation to a "proper" anvil, buy a new anvil. Yes a Record, or a no name new anvil. It may be soft and shaped like an atrocity from a cheap horror movie on youtube ... but will serve your purpose for a while. If you end up smashing the horn off or bending it out of shape, hang it on the wall with a sign on it. "I started to work on this contraption". 

My first car was a Buick 1929 with wooden spoke wheels, that I run on kero because I had no money for petrol. Things changed since then. and so will you.
Best of luck and don't forget to post pictures of your progress, workshop and creations. And don't forget that bladesmithing is not the only activity, there are a million other things you can learn to make besides knifes, and ... by the way ... that are also much easier to make and have a different more pacific purpose. 
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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Metalmelt
With the ridiculous cost of old beat-up anvils, I believe there will be more beginners looking at improvised anvils. I went to an auction that ad over 20 anvils ranging from 30 pounds to over 200. Only a couple went for less than $1000. 

I usually only make small items so I don't have a need for a large anvil. I have a piece of rail that was machined flat and a large heavy pin from a track hoe or other large machine. I would like one but the cost makes it prohibitive. I would also like a power hammer and a good propane forge. But, as my dad used to say... "Wish in one hand and crap in the other... see which one fills up the fastest."

We all do with what we can.  
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Marc
The only reason auctions like the one you describe exist, is the fact that folks go to them and pay those prices. 
And one of the reason people go there is because they believe the fallacy that old is better than new. 
That is true with wine, most of the time. With anvils, this does not hold true, if you compare apples with apples ... that is good quality with good quality, and then the new ones are better.
A simple two second search on Amazon.com brings up a lot of anvils way cheaper than $1000. Any one of them, including the $180 one will be better than a rail, particularly one that has the hard surface grinded away.
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=blacksmith+anvil&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

[_SL1500_]



[_SL1500_]


[41-RexwuLdL]

Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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Metalmelt
Reading the reviews on the "Happybuy" anvil, they are mixed. SOme say they are great and hard surface, then others say they are not hardened at all and have sand inclusions. I don't think I would waste the money on one. 

As for a piece of rail being machined flat (not ground) then it is easily re-hardened since the steel is the same chemistry throughout. It works for me. I recall one of the contestants from "Forged In Fire" using an old beat up anvil and had a satellite dish as his forge and won. A person can have all the best tools and supplies and make a bunch of crap. Or. a person can make do with what he can scrounge and win $10,000. Then maybe buy some better tools.
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bigphotog
The “happy” anvils come in two types...the 30 lb. is cast iron and the 65lb.is said to be cast steel. I almost bought one but came across a  old badger and went with it. 
When I contacted the company that ships it. I came away that the larger one is a hi quality casting of iron though they flip flop between steel and iron .Im thinking it’s a cast iron with a welded steel face. The smaller one is a lower quality casting without a  welded/ hardened striking surface.
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Marc
Yes, all true, cheap anvils are of poor quality, no free lunch to be had. 
My point is that you don't have to pay the outrageous prices the old beaten up anvils are achieving, only because of the idea that old is better than new. 
If you compare quality old anvil with quality new anvil this myth does not hold water. 
I have used cheap anvils in the past and they did a good job. The top gets marked, and the face will slowly sink if you use hammers that are too big for the mass of the anvil. All in all they will be a better choice than any improvisation you can achieve with rails or other methods. 

But it is a personal decision. I just hate watching ads online selling anvils that have half of the face missing or no face at all as "Antique genuine blacksmith anvil" going for $10 a pound or more, when you can buy good quality farrier anvils for much less, or chinese so so anvils for a fraction of that price. After all, if you only make small decorative stuff, a 500 pound Refflinghaus that can take a sledgehammer all day will be a waste. 

If anyone feels entrepreneurial, check one of the chinese manufacturers in Shanghai. Notice you can buy one unit as a sample, in lue of a further dozen or two to be sold to all those newbies out there.  
https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Professional-Manufacture-Casting-Steel-Anvil_60602615797.html?spm=a2700.7735675.normalList.27.65f33455Xhhwnf&s=p
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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bigphotog
I agree with you I’m returning to the forge after a long absence and figured I’d make all my mistakes on a beginners anvil then later buy a nicer one when my skills have improve.
Id think that would be advisable to any beginner.
I was lucky and got my used one at a reasonable price and a few goodies thrown in like a 8 in. vice because he had to move the next day to the retirement home.

I wonder if that company would forge  a anvil to a customers specks...If the order was big enough...
BTW this is what I ended up with for under 200.00
I did clean it up a little😎
65lb badger 79322A06-0852-477A-B9EB-C32D1ED835EE.jpeg
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