Matthew Shoemaker
So a little while back I came into possession of an old anvil but all I know about it is it is 102 pounds and in need of resurfacing or retirement. Im not that big into the blacksmithing community (yet) so I don't know what the logo is. I can make out manufacturing in the middle and some words around it. I was wondering If I could get some information about it and how I could go about resurfacing it, or if it's a lost cause Click image for larger version - Name: 20150806_192242.jpg, Views: 21, Size: 4.01 MB Click image for larger version - Name: 20150806_192607.jpg, Views: 24, Size: 4.32 MB Click image for larger version - Name: 20150806_183001.jpg, Views: 29, Size: 5.11 MB
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jmccustomknives
That's not too bad of a Hay Budden.  I'd start with a flap disk and clean up the surface.  Follow that up by a little peening with a hammer.  You should be able to massage those pits out somewhat.  Remember, your going to have hammer marks so little divots that aren't any deeper than your hammer marks aren't going to hurt anything.  That anvil still has life and will make a good user. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
Hello Matthew, Welcome to The Iron Forge Fire. Excellent avatar! Next the weight of your anvil might be represented in 100 weight. Unless you actual put it on the scale and got 102 lbs. It's probably  112 + 2 = 114 lbs. Read more about hundred weight here.

I can make out BUDD not sure what the line underneath Budd is. It also appears to be arched. If that's the case it's probably an early Hay-Budden London pattern anvil. I know it's a little pitted but it's a good anvil to start with. Not sure if you really need to dress the top that much. Before you do anything learn as much as you can about the anvil. Sometimes it's easy to ruin a good anvil because to made a repair that wasn't really needed.
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Matthew Shoemaker
True. I would not want to ruin it. Thanks guys for giving me the name to look for. Also, it has 102 inscribed on the side.
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Anthony San Miguel
That is a Hay Budden. They are my favorite anvil. That one looks like it has spent some time in a very humid environment. Normally I would say NO, don't resurface the face because the hardened steel face only goes so deep and then you get into the unhardened steel or worse, the wrought iron body. The more you remove the less life the anvil has left.

But because of the extent of the pitting maybe a quick pass with a flap disc would be helpful. That anvil is certainly not a lost cause!

The newer Hay Buddens, and by that I mean the ones manufactured sometime after around 1911 to around 1920 were made with the whole top half being tool steel as opposed to a wrought iron body with a tool steel plate on top.

Not sure but yours looks like it might have a tool steel plate. Hammering hot steel on it will also help polish up the face.
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