Dennis Platz
I got a new anvil today and started cleaning it up. It's a possibility that it's a Peter Wright. I think the back is broken off, alot of dings and rounded edges. It has a 1 on the left side. I can't read thr middle and a 6 on the right. I was hoping for help identifying it and some references on restoring it
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jmccustomknives
Can you post some pictures?

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Dennis Platz
Here it is. I'll try to get a close up to the maker. Click image for larger version - Name: 20160721_170459.jpg, Views: 50, Size: 5.03 MB Click image for larger version - Name: 20160722_172129.jpg, Views: 36, Size: 4.33 MB Click image for larger version - Name: 20160722_172109.jpg, Views: 31, Size: 3.98 MB
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Hank Rearden
Welcome to The Forum.

It looks like you got two really good usable anvils the large one is a London Pattern or they both are and I'm not sure if it's a broken heel or not some anvils were cast by Columbia for specific customers like your Sears Roebucks and acme a one off brand companies you may have one of those.

When I look at your photograph it looks like there's an inclusion during the casting on the chipping table. There may have been an inclusion on the hill by the PRITCHEL hole and when used it broke and a Smith just cut the heel off to clean up the anvil. The base looks like my soderfor.
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jmccustomknives
I tend to agree with Victor, at some point the big one was broke at the pritchet and the smith just cleaned it up.  There's an indention on the face at the heel, it may have been caused by the smith using the heel for some process, could have even been what broke it.  Looks like a good user, I've seen much worse.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Dennis Platz
I've seen videos of people filling in withe a arc welder and grinding flat again. Will this compromise the anvil. Right now it seems to have alot of bounce.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
As long as you keep it cool, it should be fine. My own anvil needed quite a bit of grinding to make it more usable, and I just made sure to pour water over it and let it sit for a couple minutes before continuing. It's such a large hunk of metal that it will tend to suck up most heat that will be generated. I mean, you put hotter stuff on the top of it than most heat you could produce while grinding.
As far as welding goes, I'm not sure how much exactly it would damage it. What I do know is that there is at least 1/4 inch from the weld on any weld that is tempered to a blue or black, and that does mess with the hardness. It doesn't really look like there's much to fill in on that anvil, though, so one or two spots might be acceptable. 
Right now, though, if it were mine, I'd use it pretty much as is. It's got squarer corners than my anvil, from what I can tell, and some of those radiused edges are useful.
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Dennis Platz
Sounds good. Thank you.
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jmccustomknives
General rule of thumb, don't ever weld on an anvils face unless it's useless.  The face of an anvil like this is tempered tool steel, welding on it destroys the temper.  I see nothing with that anvil that would warrant welding.  If you need a sharp edge you have a functional hardie hole, make a hardie tool for a sharp edge.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Dennis Platz
Ok. I also have the smaller 130 pound anvil with a good edge and a chisel for the Hardie hole.
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Anthony San Miguel
Congratulations on the new anvil. I see a Peter Wright and a Henry Wright in the pictures.

Personally, I wouldn't modify either. Neither are in awful or unusable condition. I would just starting hammering hot steel on either of them.
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