Marc
Hi there!
Do you find hanging hammers or other tools from the anvil stand practical? 

There is no right or wrong answer obviously since it is highly subjective, but I wonder what others do.

In my many years of work in different workshops I have never seen any professional smith do this, but that may be coincidence or local custom, who knows!
All I know is that I have the anvil mounted on a tripod with no other tools on it and my hammers and tongs for the job, are on a little trolley table I push around where I need it.  The rest of the tools are in draws, boxes or hanging somewhere. 

Clearly an anvil stand with lots of hammer hanging around it look neat and you know everything is there, but the idea that I will be showering all the hammers with hot scale and feel they are in the way of my legs seems to me that is not a good idea, but I never actually tried it. 

What do you guys do? 🙂
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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jmccustomknives
I have a hammer stand on the back side of my anvil.  It works well, but does get in the way of some things and I find that using a stump mounted anvil works better.  

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Mike Westbrook
I hang my brush under the horn but that's it everything else is in stands or little tables 
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anvil
I swear I posted here. Oh well, this will be a repeat if I did.
I keep my anvil pretty clear of everything but what Im using at the moment. Both my anvil and post vice are permanent. I keep a hot rasp on the post vice post and some scrolling forks and wrenches. I do keep my wirebrush close to the anvil.
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bigphotog
I started to hang the tools/hammers on my bace at first but soon found that a separate sand is better for many reasons... but having a few hooks or a small bracelet to keep a couple of items can can be handy...
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Mike Westbrook
I made a stand for hammers and hardies with a bending jig welded on top I bought drops from my steel supplier for a dollar a pound  and  cut them to 3 inches they go from half to five inches with 3/4 between each I use these alot for repeated rings and the hammer weight keeps it stable tongs hang by the gas forges my bending wrenches and files live under the vise stand and I have a oak stump with cast iron top beside the coal forge to lay tools on when using solid fuel  Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190722_222935768.jpg, Views: 12, Size: 311.46 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190722_223027903.jpg, Views: 13, Size: 191.89 KB
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anvil
nice setup!
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Mike Westbrook
The best part is and I'd love everyone to comment I think I have 20 hammers and use two a 3-1/2 lb cross peen round face short handle and a 16 ounce ball peen short handle I'm not sure why but the less than 10 inch handle feels the best the other is a 25 lb sledge if my wife will run the tongs but since I made the power hammer she can stay on the hill with the kids and the dogs she says the power hammer sounds like it's in the next room and the shop is 250 feet away 
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anvil
I learned long ago that you can buy far more tools than you will ever use.  🙂   Due to space, economics and being just plane frugal by nature i've rarely, but not always kept this to a minimum. 
For what its worth, for a long time, much like you, Ive had 3 daily driver hammers. All are square cut flat faced cross peens. 2-1/2#,4#, and an 8# singlejack. Oh, and a 24# that I tell friends is the one my wife uses when she helps in the shop.  

I found during my shoeing daze that I like a longer handle for all my hammers. I can choke up "to the head" or drop back a few inches or so as needed. I never hold these handles at the bitter end. What i like about them is that the longer handle acts like a counter balance and this is a real aid on the up swing to raise the handle. Also this aids in adding a little "snap" on the downswing without affecting my wrist, I can use my fingers to do this. 

Even tho I started out as a farrier using a farriers rounding hammer(round cut, round faced on one side and flat faced on the other) when I started blacksmithing, I put away that hammer and focused on what I stated above.  Over the last bunch of years I learned just what the purpose of a "rounder" truly is.  And that is, blacksmiths being simple folk, is to round.  IE specifically to forge concave shapes. Think a taper where the sides are not straight, but concave. Contrary to recent internet hype of people using a rounder as a daily driver, instead of to forge a special shape, I believe that a rounder is inefficient at forging flat surfaces. Not that you cant, just not as efficient as a flat faced hammer. one is round, one is flat. Which is more efficient at forging a flat surface? Which a concave surface?

Because of this I've added 3 more daily drivers to my hammers. I've brought back my original farriers hammer and two other rounders. Both of these are square cut, one is  1-1/2#, the other is about 3#. Both are cross peens and they all have a slightly differing radius. It took a while to figure this out, but has really opened up the ease of forging different shapes both linear and rounded.
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Mike Westbrook
I learned long ago that you can buy far more tools than you will ever use.  ðŸ™‚  

That sounds familiar always wanted a lathe and found a period correct 1912 champion 12 inch with taper jig and thread box for 300 has the line shaft and everything needs every bolt and nut checked but she's tight and heavy ! Already ordered some leather for drive belts 
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Scrambler82
I've had to back away with buying tools, too many tools, the barn is only so big.
When I do buy it has to be a good tool, in use and in manufacturer, can't stand a tool breaking when you most need it !

I purchased a lot of my power tool over thirty years ago when I built my house in MA, and they all still function and just as well as they did back then.  I just replace the power switch on the Milwaukee Drill but the drill still worked.
Buy quality and take care of what you have !

I like the idea of a see table or rack for the tools, I don't have enough of Smithing Tool YET, to worry about but I think I might look for a rack along the way. 
Thanks for the idea !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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