theengel
Right now, I'm working on a set of kitchen knives.  I'm pretty new, so I'm working on getting the metal thinner and eliminating those hammer dings.  I guess it takes practice.

Anyway, as I contemplate making a very thin filet knife, I started thinking about the way they make them industrially, with rollers that thin out the metal.  Why couldn't I do that?  They don't have to be very wide, and could be used for the finishing touches.  Just two steel rollers, that can be hand cranked, and manually adjusted for height.  Has anyone ever seen something like that for sale?
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Metalmelt
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rolling-Mill-Machine-3-80mm-Wire-Flat-Pattern-Roller-Sheet-Metal-7-Dies-/152480950602?hash=item238092a94a:g[biggrin]lYAAOSwLVZVsoCP

These rollers are more for soft metals and jewelry but if the steel is hot enough it shouldn't be a problem. There are videos on U-toob of some knife makers using rollers for blades.
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jmccustomknives
It takes a lot of pressure for a rolling mill to do it's job.  When doing kitchen or other thin blades I'll just start with material, new or reclaimed (like band saw steel) since it's already thin.  I'll grind the profile in, but not the edge bevels.  This is because thin blades like to warp in the quench, bevels make it more likely unless they are perfect.  After hardening and tempering I'll come back and grind the bevels making sure the blade is kept cool.  This method is standard proceedure for the guys that work with stainless cutlery.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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theengel
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This is because thin blades like to warp in the quench, bevels make it more likely unless they are perfect. 


I didn't realize this.  I figured the bevel will be easier before hardening, so I'm grinding bevels now.  Although, it's very slow going because I don't have a decent belt sander.  I'm using a file.  I guess I'll harden & temper now, before finishing them.  I've only got about half the bevel in.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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jmccustomknives
It will be tough sledding doing it that way without any kind of belt grinder.  Let us know how it works out.
 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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