Duce
"You're not going to break out the sledge on this one". This was posted on Improvised anvil thread. Is there a rule of thumb for anvil/weight and hammer size?
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NorrinRadd
You'll hear a couple of different things. What stuck in my mind from a few years ago was anvil +20x heavier than hammer. Of course how its mounted can make a lot of difference too.
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Duce
That does make sense, 100# anvil 5# hammer. Thanks
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jmccustomknives
I've used the 20 to 1 ratio.  It can be a little light though.  I can make my 200lb Fisher do a dance with a 10lb sledge.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Duce
At this stage of the game the only thing I could do with a 10# sledge is set it in the corner and admire it, maybe dust it now and again.😉. Oh yeah, can't dance.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
. . . I have only a 100# anvil, but I still use a ten pound sledge on it. . .
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confederatemule
I always figgered the size of the work I'm doin determines the size of the hammer. 

Y'all must be talkin bout the biggest hammer fer the size of the anvil. Fer a 100lb anvil don't use a hammer bigger than 5lb. Is that correct?

Just tryin to figger it out.
Mule
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Duce
confederatemule wrote:
I always figgered the size of the work I'm doin determines the size of the hammer. 

Y'all must be talkin bout the biggest hammer fer the size of the anvil. Fer a 100lb anvil don't use a hammer bigger than 5lb. Is that correct?

Just tryin to figger it out.
Mule


That's the way I take it. But, quality of anvil, anvil mounting and hammer technique makes for a plus or minus factor.
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mtforge
I use the hammer sized to the work I'm doing not the size of the anvil. 95% of my work is done with a 2 1/4# hammer. I go to a 3 to 4# hammer when pointing 1/2" square stock. It is hard to do scrolls and rolls with a big hammer.
A power hammer works better with the 20 to 1 ratio. I videoed a knife maker for a time study. He used two power hammers, one under the ratio and one over it. In the video you could see the scale bouncing on the light one and staying put on the good ration one.
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Duce
There was 2 reason I started this thread, not to over task your equipment. Although with what was posted, with good technique you can do some heavy work with light equipment. Also, for the beginner finding a London pattern anvil should be a goal, rather than a hindererince. Think outside the box when it comes to anvils. The first thing I ever forged was a stick pin/vent pick out of a 16P nail with a propane torch, and the flat on the back of a bench vise. MT would you care to explain your 20 to 1 ratio.
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mtforge
On a power hammer any weight below the top of the anvil counts to the weight of the anvil. Including mounting and other items. It does need to be secure and not loose. When the hammer hits and the anvil is light it tends to bounce losing some power. If it is at the 20 to 1 ratio or above the force gets absorbed into the mass of the anvil and you will get more work from the blow. As I said watching the scale in the video you could see the bounce from the less than 20 to 1 power hammer. I have seen this in my own shop anvils. I have four anvils we use about the shop. From 87# to 170#. Using the same hammer the smaller anvil will get less work, more bounce. The larger anvil will absorb the blow and give me more movement of the stock I'm hitting.
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theengel
Thanks for explaining that.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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anvil
I differ on that.

What's critical is your connection between anvil and Ground. That's usually two connections. Anvil to stump and stump to ground. My stump is buried 2'-3' into the ground.

My anvil is scribed on the stump and chiseled in about 2". An inch of fine sand in the cutout and the anvil levels into the sand.

It's the tightest joinery I've ever used, and deadens the ring as well.

With this setup any sized good anvil will work as well as any other heavier or lighter anvil,, all things being g equal.

However!?? Never hit either the heel or horn with a full blow from a heavy sledge, no matter your anvil size.
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