Anthony San Miguel
I didn't want to hijack the other thread about sawmill circular saw blades so I'm starting this one. I got to thinking about the extremely high carbon content in the D4 blades that my friend has. I have a lot of wrought iron. I got more this weekend when I visited a scrapyard near the Guadalupe Forge Bladesmithing event and got a wrought iron wagon wheel and an old Mac Tools tool box that somebody tried to hide, among other things.

But back to my point. With the extremely high carbon content in D4 I could afford some serious carbon migration and still have enough carbon throughout the blank to harden up plenty. I know that both D4 and wrought iron each have their own peculiar forging characteristics. Matter of fact, I don't even know for sure that the D4 is forgeable. But if it is, I wonder what a Damascus billet with the two would look like. The WI already displays a grainy pattern if etched right. The D4 is a complex alloy with a lot of carbon, moly and chromium.

Any thoughts?
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Anthony San Miguel
I just looked into D4 on HTS' Heat Treater's Guide Companion and it says it's forgeable. I know that that doesn't mean it's easy to forge, but these saw blades aren't thick stock.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
One thing for sure is that, if you're going to forge it, keep it at a higher temperature; don't work it cold. 
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Anthony San Miguel
Both need to be worked very hot. That, and the fact that each has the potential to produce their own unique pattern are probably the only things they have in common. I wouldn't know how to heat treat the billet, though. The D4 is air hardening but can be oil quenched. The WI of course, has no carbon but I would count on carbon migration.
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jmccustomknives
I seriously doubt those blades are a true d-4, that stamp probably means something else.  D-4 would be brittle as it is a cold work tool steel and isn't suitable for high speed rotation.  That being said, stay away from the wrought/high carbon combo as it doesn't make a very good knife.  Better to get some 1084 and the saw plate. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Dominic
Pretty sure you would have to do a San mai type billet to keep the wrought iron away from the edge.
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Hank Rearden
I just wanted to add my $0.02 worth here. First of all I think it's an excellent topic. Discussions on what metals the designation of alloys making up the metals and if they can be welded together is good conversation.
Ultimately my goal would be to experiment with what I have and see what works. Then share what I did so others could give it a try, if they have some similar metals. I have an old lawn mower blade some band saw blades made up of .08% cobalt and even though conventional wisdom says that Cobalt won't weld well together, I still want to give it a try. Nothing says learning then actual doing, succeed or fail.
Next week I'll have plenty of time at the forge so I'm going to do some experimentation, however; my my real goal is to actually purchase what metal I actually need to successfully create a billet and then see if I can do that as well.
Thanks to everyone for their input.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
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