Ironpicker64
Hello All,

I come from a long line of folks, who enjoy picking for iron, wood and rust, for fun.  We've never invested a lot of money (because we never had any), but had a lot of fun doing it.  Now, as I am in the latter chapters of my life, I have taken time to open a booth in an antique mall.  My grandfather was a lifetime railroad man, and was talented in creating things for practical purposes and for trading.  I have always had a love and interest in things like blacksmithing, but never enough time to pursue anything.  So, I have joined this site, in hopes of it being a learning resource.
 
My first question here, is to ask if there was/is a purpose for cove cut-outs on the 4 edges of the neck of a hammer head, other than aesthetic or artistic creation?  My profile picture shows the example I am referring to.  I found this hammer head, and am preparing to clean it up.  There are some numbers imprinted on the top (?43 that I can see), and I'm not sure about any imprints on the side.

Thank you for any ideas or facts, and for any helpful information of things to look for.  Keep the art of blacksmithing alive! Blacksmith Hammer 01.jpg
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Marc
That is part of the forging process. The neck isolates the face of the hammer from the cheeks and allows the forger to give the head a face larger than the parent stock. 
That is not always the case and a face may be smaller but still in the forging process the neck gives the hammer head a definition. 
Aesthetics are not just aesthetics as in just for looks. A balanced pleasing look, makes for a balanced and pleasing tool. Both are linked and inseparable. 
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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jmccustomknives
that was my thoughts too marc, but I'm a blade smith so what do I know.  lol. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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anvil
Yup, these Fuller marks or cove cuts are used to define different masses.

Form follows function
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Hank Rearden
Just a note on your tool. This appears to many as a hammer. More accurately it is a top tool that is stuck by a hammer. Even though its name includes the word hammer. (Set Hammer) in it.

This best I can tell it is a set tool. There is a matching anvil hardy named a bottom hammer.

Now, how a person uses it to create something is a completely different topic.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Hank Rearden
Ps are you selling it. I might be interested.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Ironpicker64
Hank,  I may be selling it soon.  I put it in my rust remover, and will be doing some sanding.  It was pretty well coated, so the process will be slow.  I also spent time identifying, marking and cleaning other items, for my booth.  If you want to leave me an email address here, I can get back to you on selling the items.

Thanks,
Rod 
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Hank Rearden
Sound good. You can private message me via the forum.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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