bigphotog
I currently use 01 440 and A2 for my endeavors in knife making...01 I’ve forged before as for me it is the the most forgiving at my stage. A2 and 440 I do use only metal removal methods and send out to be hardened.
I’m not ready to buy a kiln yet but as I progress I will probably go that route.
but for now I have read you can forge A2but is it evan worth trying to? 
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jmccustomknives
A-2 is forgeable, but it is an air hardening steel.    Because it's air hardening if it's comes in the annealed state you have two choices;  either forge below austinizing temperature.  Doing it this way is slow going, but you won't have any grain growth.  However for most this technique isn't going to be as simple as it sounds.  The other technique is to forge above austinitizing temps.  Since it's an air hardening steel once the steel starts cooling on the anvil it will start hardening so all forging will need to be done above 1750F.  If you drop below that temp and strike it with your hammer it is very likely to crack.  

For the most part the air hardening steels should be left to the stock removal realm.  

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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bigphotog
Thanks James for the info...I think it would be best to stay with metal removal on A-2 I have a system down that works...so don’t fix it😎
I’m still exploring working with different metals and enjoying the journey.
I’ve built a small gas forge and slowly building my shop/forge.
My knifes are simple and I’m finding that I enjoy making other useful things with the forge. 
FYI: I was in the middle of making a new stand for my Badger when I took this photo.
72B10F4F-6716-426D-9327-E3C0AC2277D1.jpeg 
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jmccustomknives
Yeah, a lot of guys try to reinvent the wheel, I was once one of them.  Since then I've taken the approach that simple is better.  That's a good looking blade, I bet it performs as good as it looks.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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