Hammerhand
I volunteer at Washington on the Brazos State Historic park and we celebrated the Texas Independence this past weekend.  I have all my own stuff since the park has no money to fund a smithy.  And because it has no smithy, I always forge outside.  Well, this weekend was cold and rainy which normally I find better than hot and muggy.  However, I soon noticed rust forming on my anvil face.  Then I noticed rust forming on the items I had for sale.  The items for sale had all been treated with wax but the wax was flaking off because I waxed the stuff several years ago.  I don't normally sell my wares.  I am dressing my anvil with a very stiff wire wheel and the forged items with a wire brush.  I will then have to re-heat them to blacken them and rewax them.  I may use BLO instead of wax.  My advice to young smiths is this:  If you plan to sell you goods, prime and paint them.  Or give them a light coat of oil.  As for your anvil, a light coat of WD40 might be sufficient.  Or just don't forge in the rain!
Quote 0 0


Hank Rearden
I got my anvil from a diesel shop that had closed when the mechanic/owner retired. So my guess is the anvil got cold forging and by the grinder and slag marks  on the face and edges used more like a welders bench.  Last summer I cleaned the edges by rounding them over. I use different locations as fullers now. I also cleaned the face.  I forge in my drive way and keep all my tools just inside my garage door. So I get the water and blown snow when ever I open the door. Which is more often than I care for to expose my favorite things to the elements. Plus I got caught in some rain before I could get everything put away. I melted bees wax over it and so far no signs of rust. The body is oil black and the clean shine of the face and horn look great to boot. But I still can not got my wife interested. Oh well. I hit it with WD-40 from time to time also. Photo was before I rounded the edge on the far side of the picture.

anvil clean copy.jpg 
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
Quote 0 0
Hammerhand
Well, I am going to bring a can of oil with me from now on!
Quote 0 0
jmccustomknives
I live in the deep south, my shop is covered up.  Yet quite often the humidity that follows a cold snap makes everything in the shop sweat like it's raining inside.  lol.  I've found the best rust remover is hot iron and a hammer.  [wink]

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

Quote 0 0
Hank Rearden
Love that answer JMC!
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
Quote 0 0
Hammerhand
Well, I used a wire cup and it did a fine job on the anvil.  Yes, hot iron and a hammer would work too,  but I also had a bunch of stuff for sale that was already finished and I had to use the wire wheel on my grinder to get the rust off.  I live on the Texas Gulf Coast so I know all about humidity.
Quote 0 0
Scrambler82
Cold Snap..., Humidity... not things we run into here in SoCal but watch out for spray on his, watch the "Flammability Level" and the direction you are spraying... not towards the forge.

The thing I worried about in New England was the humidity, I used to rub in some White Lithium Grease, the stuff we used was so sticky, sort of like Red Grease, seemed to stay put.

When outside with tool and it rains, an Oily Rag worked best for me, that is once the side of the anvil has been coated all that needed a quick wipe was the top, tools  just need to keep cleaning and oiling.  

An oily rag makes it a little easier, agin, keep the hot slag away from the rag.

Just what do I do and will probably keep doing, even out here where there is sunny days and low humidity.
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
Quote 0 0