anvil
Howdy. I just got a piece of meteorite from the tuson area.

It is perhaps connected to one of the:

https://azcapitoltimes.com/news/2017/10/19/two-tucson-meteorites/

It's heavy, black and magnetic.

Anybody have experience forging meteorite?

Thanks in advance.
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jmccustomknives
I haven't ever had one to do that with.  I think if I had one I'd use it for fixtures and not a blade.  I do understand you'll keep that crystal pattern if you don't get it too hot.  Forging of course also depends on the amount of inclusions in the material.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
I think it's very interesting. Please post results. It's extremely rare to be able to forge something from the galaxy. Waaaay Koooool...
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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anvil
It's been on my list for a long time,,, then just, so to speak, fell out of the sky into my hands!. Actually a guift from a friend.

It's black, heavy, and magnetic. That means it has iron or steel in it.

I'll probably lose that crystal pattern when I forge it, so prepared for that. I'll treat it sort of like a cosmic Bloom and remove the impurities and inclusions.

Not sure of what I'll make from it. Probably after forging it into a billet, I'll spark test for carbon content, then go from there.
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jmccustomknives
Understand, most meteorites fall into two categories; Stony and iron.  Normally even the stony ones will have some iron present.  The iron ones will have nickel and usually olivine present as inclusions.  The iron/nickel variety do not have any carbon.  You could smelt it down, but you loose everything that makes it valuable as a meteorite.  Having it cut and polished is the only way to determine if it's suitable (enough iron) to even work with. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Marc
I wonder why would you want to forge it? It's a rare object and probably valuable as it is.
Once you forge it you will probably turn it into some unknown mix of metal of dubious value. 
Unless you think it has magical properties, I would leave it as it is. Now it's a meteorite, forged is a lump of who knows what. 
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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anvil
Interesting responses to my original question.

"Anybody have experience forging meteorite?"

I've asked this on a few sites, and via phone with other Smith's as well. Negative responses, or "nope" type responses like yours, Marc, are in the minority. There's far more courageous types out there willing, as Blacksmiths, to lay hammer to this, or any, cosmic Bloom,,, made elsewhere than our planet, than those who fear to test their skills with this unknown. Isn't that the history of mankind? If that's not reason enough to explore "new frontiers" than most likely any other response would fall on deaf ears.
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anvil
jmccustomknives wrote:
Understand, most meteorites fall into two categories; Stony and iron.  Normally even the stony ones will have some iron present.  The iron ones will have nickel and usually olivine present as inclusions.  The iron/nickel variety do not have any carbon.  You could smelt it down, but you loose everything that makes it valuable as a meteorite.  Having it cut and polished is the only way to determine if it's suitable (enough iron) to even work with. 


There is at least another way to test the difference. That is to see if it will cut with a hack saw. If it does, and it does, and it "feels" like iron, it most likely is iron, or as I like to think of it, rather clean cosmic Bloom.

A polish and etch of my piece is next. I will spark test this piece as well and keep it, labeled, with the rest of my known steels.

Thanks for your input.
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Scrambler82
Pictures... pls !

Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
I will. I've cut off a small piece and am picking up sandpaper this morning. I'll polish and etch this piece,, then pics.
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Hank Rearden
Any updates
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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anvil
LOl, not yet. Good weather is here and am putting my shop together.

I hack sawed off a piece, which is a good sign it's iron and not other no iron stuff and started hand polishing it to see the natural pattern. Not ready to etch it yet. Soon.
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