jmccustomknives
I got board this weekend and wanted to use the coal forge.  I figured shooting a video would be fun. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Definitely a good practice project! Like you said, it's good to get away from knife making to practice with other things. (In my book you can't call yourself a blacksmith if you don't do a lot of different kinds of forging projects.)
Speaking of practice, looks like you need some new tongs. [wink]
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jmccustomknives
I love those big ole' vice grips.  They aren't much help in the dragons breath forge but work perfectly in the coal.  It's cheating, but I'm lazy. [wink]  FYI, $10 at Tractor Supply.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
True. . . But is still cheating. [biggrin]

Also, I like what you did to the leaf when you were done; curling it over the rest of it gives a nice natural feel.
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NorrinRadd
Great video. The hooks look really good. That steel sounds real interesting.
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retter
Thanks for sharing the video. 
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Hank Rearden
Nice. Nothing but rain or extreme cold around here. Enjoyed the forging by proxy. I needed a little inspiration.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Yves
Where is the cheating ? When a blacksmith uses a tool, doesnt the tool become a blacksmith's tool ? Were not vise grips developed by a blacksmith ?

Am I starting something here ?
The alternative to getting old is not interesting.
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jmccustomknives
Yves wrote:
Where is the cheating ? When a blacksmith uses a tool, doesnt the tool become a blacksmith's tool ? Were not vise grips developed by a blacksmith ?

Am I starting something here ?

Not at all.  I do find it amusing when someone says, "That's not the traditional way to do it". Like it a smith from an earlier time wouldn't have used it if he had the chance.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Yves
Traditionaly, blacksmiths had an apprentice at least or apprentices. We, most of the time, I believe, work alone. Off the bat tradition  takes a beating. No one would dare say that Yellin, who defended traditional design and work, was not a traditional blacksmith, but he was quite grateful to Mr. Miller for his invention. Nor would anyone dare claim that Edgar Brandt was not a blacksmith, but there is a video I saw of him using an acetylene torch to weld forged ornaments together. And when we MIG templates for a run of identical forged components for say a balustrade, does our work loose it's traditional quality ?

So, I believe a definition of what traditional blaksmithing is to be rather elusive. I am always weary when claiming tradition as the reference for blasmithing of becoming like the guy that despised the use of the fountain pen believing that litterature would never be as good as when it was written with a goose quill.
The alternative to getting old is not interesting.
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Hank Rearden
Great comparison.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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anvil
but he was quite grateful to Mr. Miller for his invention.".  Yves, "So, I believe a definition of what traditional blaksmithing is to be rather elusive.". Its actually not. Pick any of the books by any of the greats, past or present. Do you recognize that as Traditional Blacksmithing? I do. How do you get that look? by learning the techniques of the traditional smith. 

Does that mean no modern tools? Nope, but it does mean that without the knowledge gained " by hammer in hand", it will look at the very best, forged and fabricated, at the very least fabricated. 

It takes experience to create the aesthetic of forged work. Without this experience you will not know how to apply these tools and maintain the aesthetic you are seeking. 

So, when a young potential smith reads this type of statement and hits a hard learning time, realizes he can save time via modern tools, he will never achieve that thing called traditional ironwork.  

two examples:  first take a right angle bend. I first learned this in the fire. When i could do this well, i was shown how to use a torch for a localized heat. When finished, there was no aesthetic difference, and the torch saved time.  Lets say you have no idea how to forge one efficiently, but you can forge one with a major amount of time invested into each. Why heck, butt them up, grind to get a full weld, call in mr miller, then grind away the gradoo.  Oh, now what ya got? a ground missmatched finish and more times than not, a waspwaist of one degree or another.  Up to this point, the time is about equal, forged or fabbed, assuming a competent smith. And the fabbed angle now must be worked more to achieve that aesthetic forged look. 

next example: lets look at your mig welded pickets. You were rather vague as to what you mean by " identical forged components". Are these purchased forged pieces, or your own or your shops forgings? And what is your purpose? Forged? forged/fabbed? Fabbed? 

Lets take a simple picket. Should you forge tenons and have a forged to dimension picket, or call on Mr Miller? My answer is to use tenons. And for a simple reason. I can do a simple forged railing, no chamfered edges, drilled or ironworker punched( i dont have a ironworker) peened rivets and i charge about 10% more than the better fabricators. And call it a hand forged product. I do use a torch to heat my tenons. Thus I have no need to call in Mr Miller. And, most importantly, I can call my product "forged". 

" So, I believe a definition of what traditional blaksmithing is to be rather elusive. ". No its not. Its very clear. I believe that nearly everyone who comes into this craft does so because they/we have a totally clear idea as to what that means. What is not known is how to achieve that look. What brought you to this craft? Answer that and you have your answer.

So simply said, an experienced smith knows how to use any tool to achieve his aesthetic whilst a novice smith has no clear idea how to get there at all.

And dont take this as an elitist attitude. I know too many forged/fab guys and fabricators whose work is excellent. And we dont compete with each other because our products aesthetic are not the same.


 
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Art's Anvil
I have to say I agree with the misconception of what make a blacksmith traditional.  Even Mousehole Anvils were forged together with water powered hammers. The blacksmith like any other tradesman or craftsman used every new tool or invention that he could to his advantage, I even hear people argue about coal and charcoal.
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