IronRainForge
Froe from heavy duty leaf spring. Should have just gone w/mild steel- cracked the first attempt. Click image for larger version - Name: image.jpeg, Views: 73, Size: 514.90 KB
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Definitely heavy duty.
Where did it crack?
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IronRainForge
The wrap that goes around the handle had 2inches more. Mistakenly quenched in water and when I put the handle on, the wrap broke off completely. Re-normalized,and re-forged the wrap.
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jmccustomknives
IronRainForge wrote:
The wrap that goes around the handle had 2inches more. Mistakenly quenched in water and when I put the handle on, the wrap broke off completely. Re-normalized,and re-forged the wrap.


It happens.  Looks handy.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Yeah, never quench leaf springs in water. I learned the hard way.
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Hank Rearden
This is a great tool. Glad to see forged and great picture context  to boot.

You know I believe you can quench water quench steel in oil. If that's the case oil should be a go to first. Anyone know if that's true?
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
My family got me a book two years ago called Master Bladesmith by Jim Hrisoulas, and one section in it that I find very interesting is where he goes over the common and also the more uncommon knife steels like the air-hardening series and even stainless for forging. He includes their composition, toughness, whether or not they're red-hard, temperatures for forging, annealing, quenching and tempering, as well as what they quench in. 

He does go over water quench steels like W1 and WHC, and while they are water quench, he does recommend quenching in oil because it leaves less chance for error. That being said, he does say it's alright to harden those in water, but the oil is just his preference.
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