NorrinRadd
So we tried some forge welding with flux in my gas forge and I guess my kiln wash needed to be reapplied (which I didn't do) and now the fire brick floor is "vitrifying" I think that's the word for it, I call it turning to goo at forging temps.

Is there anyway to stop this short of forge surgery?
Thanks Gurus

Just make something!

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Dominic
I would recommend lining the forge with satinite or another high temp refractory cement. I use satinite and it stops the flux from eating away at the kao wool and fire brick floor. Another option would be anti hydrous borax which will not eat away at the brick as quickly, but if your looking for durability I would use satinite.
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jmccustomknives
I agree with Dominic in that you needs something else in the floor.  Borax will eat up anything it touches, things like bubble alumina will hold up much better.  If you've ever seen how my forge was made for easy rebuilding, that's why.  I have to rebuild it once a year or so.  That stuff will eat through refractory cement and firebrick. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Dominic
True
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
These guys probably have the best idea.

I use kiln shelving in my forge, and it did turn to goo after I forge welded in it, but since I decided to use my coal forge from now on for that practice, I haven't been having borax in it, and the flux-induced goo has turned back to solid. Might do the same for you if you leave it. (No guarantees though.)
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Dominic
Yea coal forges will make your life easier when it comes to forge welding.
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Ohio Rusty
My forge (Majestic 2 burner) has brick in the bottom so I put clay tiles in the bottom, that only worked for a little bit as the clay tiles melted to a glass like look and cracked in pieces. Next I relined my forge with 1/2 inch kaowool fiber blanket to insulate it a bit better and keep in more heat. I cut up a pizza stone and put a piece in the bottom. After all ... pizza stones a used to high heat, right ? well .... that didn't work either as it cracked in piece the first time I used it. I don't think the stone was designed for that much heat. I ordered off Ebay from a guy a piece of kaowool board. As soon as it gets here, I'll cut the hard kaowool board to fit the bottom of the forge. That board is good to 2300 degrees so that should be what I need to line bottom of the forge and protect the kaowool fiber blanket lining in the bottom so the pieces don't catch on it and tear it up.
Ohio Rusty ><>
The Ohio Frontier Forge
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jmccustomknives
Ohio Rusty wrote:
My forge (Majestic 2 burner) has brick in the bottom so I put clay tiles in the bottom, that only worked for a little bit as the clay tiles melted to a glass like look and cracked in pieces. Next I relined my forge with 1/2 inch kaowool fiber blanket to insulate it a bit better and keep in more heat. I cut up a pizza stone and put a piece in the bottom. After all ... pizza stones a used to high heat, right ? well .... that didn't work either as it cracked in piece the first time I used it. I don't think the stone was designed for that much heat. I ordered off Ebay from a guy a piece of kaowool board. As soon as it gets here, I'll cut the hard kaowool board to fit the bottom of the forge. That board is good to 2300 degrees so that should be what I need to line bottom of the forge and protect the kaowool fiber blanket lining in the bottom so the pieces don't catch on it and tear it up.
Ohio Rusty ><>
The Ohio Frontier Forge


If your planning on forge welding, that board isn't going to hold up either.  But I think you probably already know that, just saying it for anyone who might think it would.  There isn't much that will hold up to borax, but bubble alumina refractory holds up a little.  If one coats the board with that it might last a little longer.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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