Anthony San Miguel
A few Saturdays ago I was leaving a local flea market that I like to go to because I usually find something good. I found my 100 lb Trenton made Acme anvil there, among other things.

There are a lot of horse owners in the area around the flea market and I drive by a patch of land that has around 2 dozen stables on my way home every time I leave the flea market. The property is fenced off and the gate is always closed, but I have been keeping my eyes open in the hopes of driving in and asking around for anything blacksmith/farrier related that somebody might be willing to part with. Heck, I'd take a bunch of used farrier's rasps if the price was good, although I have found that many farriers are happy to just give you some.

Well this particular Saturday morning the gate was open so I drove in. I eventually found the owner of the property, who was also the resident farrier. He had tossed all his used rasps already but said he would start to save them for me. What struck me the most was what he was working with. He was actually making a living as a farrier using a RR anvil that he had ground a horn on to shape shoes with and had drilled a hardy hole into. It wasn't even heavy mainline rail, but lighter secondary rail. I offered to give him a piece of heavier rail but he kindly thanked me and said that it had been enough trouble grinding and drilling the lighter rail that he was using and besides, it was working for him.

That same morning, before I stopped at this particular place I had stopped at a feed store down the road from the flea market where I saw a father and son shoeing a horse and also using a RR rail anvil. This was here in San Antonio, Texas and these guys were making a living using RR rail!

I have 4 anvils, 5 if you include the stake anvil. It got me to thinking how blessed I am. I really, thoroughly enjoy working in my shop with the tools I have!

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
It's not the tools that make the worker useful; it's the skill of the worker that makes the tools useful. 
I agree that we should be thankful for that which we have, and use it gladly!
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mtforge
It is interesting to see what is used for an anvil around the world. I never thought about this locally.
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jmccustomknives
If you ever noticed a ferriers anvil is typically light.  I could understand how a farrier might gain an affinity for one.  As far a anvils go, I know guys who have been looking for years for one.  It only took me almost 5 years to find mine.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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mtforge
I've heard from people that they can't find anvils. Maybe it's just my area but they are common on Craigslist, auctionzip.com and even Ebay. When I tell them this they say they are too expensive. So they can be found just not cheap.
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jmccustomknives
I think part of the problem in the deep south was that during WWII there was a strong effort to recycle steel for the war effort.  All those anvils that had been sitting in barns got melted down.  While they can be found, for most guys money is an issue.  It also doesn't help when people think because a Peter Wright with half the face broke off is "old" it's worth $800. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Also, a lot of anvils you can find that are still left from the Civil War have their horn broken off, and many people don't want something that is little more than a stump anvil. (Though there is nothing wrong with it if you can still pound metal on it.)
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NorrinRadd
Some of the problem is that they are also "collectible". So there is some hoarding involved as well. I'd bet that wasn't an issue in the early part of the 20th century. Not to mention that more people want to get involved because of the current "DIY" or "Maker" trends on the net.
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