Hank Rearden
I'm looking for advice on restoring an anvil.
The repairs are simple compared to some. My top plate is fine and overall the anvil is useable. I want to do this first for the experience and second who's making quality anvils you can afford anymore?

I'll need to add welded material to the side of the body just below the face plate. Mostly a fill and grind operation. My concern is losing any temper or other issues I'm not aware of. Below is a photo of the side I want to clean up.

My first thought was heat the area to weld prior to welding and only doing a few quick spots to build the weld to help control the heat better.

Is TIG, MIG or Stick best to make this weld?
Is a special rod needed?
Has anyone else made similar repairs?

Anvil is circa 1870-1875 Fisher Norris.

fisher norris anvil.jpg 
Is anyone familure with the techniques that Columbus forge used to repair anvils?

columbus forge anvil.jpg 
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TomW
According to Richard Postman's book "Anvils in America", the Fisher Norris anvil is a cast iron anvil with a steel face.  It appears that most of the damage is in the cast iron body.  To weld cast iron, special rod and proceedures should be used or there can be problems with brittleness of the iron in the heat transition zone of the weld and cracking when the weld cools and shrinks.  Some people stick weld cast iron with nickel rod, controlling the preheat, and peening the weld as it cools.  Rob Gunter wrote an article some time back about anvil repair although it is aimed towards the anvil face:  http://www.anvilmag.com/smith/anvilres.htm 
While the damage is ugly looking, it may not hurt the function of the anvil.  You might only want to repair any area where the steel face is not supported. 
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Hank Rearden
Hello Tomw and thanks for the link.

I'll read and study it before I do anything. The anvil has a good rebound when hit in the center of the work plate. I've given it a lot of thought about making any repair. At first was going to use it as is. The more I thought about it the more it was obvious that not repairing it now will probable cause damage later that becomes too difficult a repair I could make if I break the top plate. At a quick glance I see valuable information on making the weld correctly. You input is greatly appreciated. Thanks again.
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Hank Rearden
Here's a 150 lbs. Fisher Norris anvil on ebay that has the tool steel plate on the horn separating. click here to see the auction. Broken Anvil Auction ends March 3rd, 2014 If you're up to the task of repairing this anvil it looks like it has plenty of years service.

Here's what I would do.  Cut the horn near the chipping table were the separation ends to remove the top plate. Grind the cast part of the horn beveling to get access to fully weld to plate back on. The beveling would leave a peak leaving a thin ridge in the center for proper alignment and placement of the plate being reattached.  The cut at the chipping table would also have a bevel for adding weld material.  Then I would follow the advice from the link provided in the post above.

That's how this amateur would fix it. Not bad for a days work and fifty bucks


broken fisher anvil horn.jpg 

broken horn fisher anvil.jpg 

broken fisher norris.jpg 
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Hank Rearden
I just picked up 3 temp sticks 350 degrees, 400 degrees and 450 degrees. Plan on getting the the stoody 2110 and 1105 welding rods next week. Should have the restoration underway by the end of June. Many Thanks to TOMW for the link to anvil repairs.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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