Dustin Stephens
Anyone had experience with an induction forge? Been watching them on you tube and the seem very efficient, and you can use them indoors.  Dont know the draw on the ole electric bill but it looks like something worth getting or building.  Whaddya think?
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jmccustomknives
Like you I've never seen one in action other than video.  I could see where that system coupled with an argon atmosphere would be very nice for forging Damascus.  I do think it would run up the ol' electric bill. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Anubhav Gupta
Forging is a manufacturing process in which a metal is pressed pounded and squeezed to get it into the desired shape. Aluminium forging is used where the light weight is the necessary requirement. 
There are three major types of forging:
1) Open die forging, suitable for large components
2) closed die forging, suitable for more intricate design.
3)Ring rolled forging, used to create high strength ring based applications.
 
Features of forging:
  • High performance and strength
  • Forged aluminium perfect for aerospace
  • Tools of the trade
  • Mark of quality
http://chwforge.com/products/aluminium-forgings/
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hogallen
Mike Sobrado at Dragon Forge in Mesa AZ uses an induction for and it is pretty cool. Heats fast and can remain very localized for fine work. Fun toy!

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Hank Rearden
Induction sould be discussed. I just read something a few days ago and the article exempted it induction forges for the process. I'm not real sure and now it bothering me what it actually meant. I didn't pay much attention to the details and now I'm kicking myself.
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mtforge
Induction was how Offcenter tongs were made.




And Mark Aspery uses it
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Dominic
for the price of an induction forge you could take a class from Alec Steele, including the ticket.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
I know they use induction forges commercially, like the Gransfors Bruks axe company, as well as industrial companies that make bolts and ball bearings and whatnot. I suppose at that large scale it's more cost-effective? It heats steel much more quickly than any fuel-fire forge, but it consumes electricity. 
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