Hank Rearden
A few post ago I showed a log that I saved to become a new anvil stump. Well I got started on it. I'm going to finish this up but I'm not real happy with my workmanship. I think you get the idea I wanted from the pics. Yes, I've already picked another log for the next go around.

Originally this was for my 203 lbs. Soderfor. Now, I think my 147 lbs. Fisher will be perched on it. The smaller anvil will help me correct the mistakes I made in eyeballing the chainsaw cuts.

Requirement for my new stump.

     1. Pleasing to the eye and functional.
     2. The ability to adjust the height by 2" to 3".
     3. Anchor points for anvil hold downs.
     4. Stable to prevent easy tip overs.

So I idea is angle iron on the square corners. this will allow pre cut spacers to fit under the anvil raising or lowering the working height of the anvil. The angle iron will also keep the anvil in place. The tapered base will allow for stability while minimizing the obstruction around the work areas of the anvil. Working side of anvil cut more steeply or vertical for hanging hammers and allowing more standing more while at the anvil. Angle iron will also cover the tapered corners and have tabs to hook springs in for hold downs.

anvil stump cut.png 


cut stump anvil.png  

The circular saw had a hard time cutting. Wood still wet.


anvil stump.png 

You can see how I cut in to the stump with the chainsaw in the lower right corner. I hope to minimize this with making this the working side of the anvil.

anvil stump fisher.png 

Below are some pics I think are self explanatory. The next stump I hope to find a band saw that can make better cuts. I'm sure I'll come up with better designs as I go. I'll be sure to post them.


code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
I've got a big cedar stump I need to do that with.  Going to use it for demo's just because it's so much lighter.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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johnrgarland
I just left mine natural. Added leather straps all around the top for my hammers and bolted the anvil down with a chain and some lag bolts. It is about time for another one.
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Metalmelt
I think it looks great, I guess it would depend on the anvil. I like the ones that use cross straps to hold down the anvil. No, this is not mine. [smile]

Image result for anvil stand
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anvil
I'm building my "dream shop". This includes anvil and post vice stumps. I have pics of my old ones. I'll see if I can post them. I strongly suggest notching your anvil into the stump and using fine sand to level it and deaden the ring.

No other fasteners needed. V
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Hank Rearden
Let me know if you need help posting those pictures.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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anvil
I've separated out the pics. I will try to do a "tutorial with these old stumps tomorrow. It will be a first for me.
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anvil
Here's a first attempt at a pic tutorial by me. Hope it helps.

This is on a way to set up your stump by notching your anvil into the stump and bedding it in sand. This does a few things. It removes Amy other form of securing your anvil which will just get in your way. It means that moving it is quick and easy to do, such as reversing it end for end. The sand will deaden the noise far better than chains or a magnet

Please note that this way is for a permanently mounted anvil. I know many can't do this. I will say that as you progress or decide to have a dedicated shop that making your anvil stump permanent will affect your work like night to day. You will be able to remove all movement of stump and anvil which makes every blow far more efficient and you add the mass of the earth to back up ywr anvil!

Francis Whitaker has a more portable way to mount an anvil. However, its still heavy to move. His system is best for being able to adjust the height of your anvil. You will find his method in "the blacksmiths cookbook".

Also, be for warned, I'm building a new shop and will add my permanent anvil stand and post vice mount in the near future, so you will have to muddle thru pics of my old ones.

Please note that I tar my stumps, put a foot or so of pea gravel at the bottom, and use pea gravel or ~3/4" gravel around the sides. This allows any moisture to move to the bottom and keep the rot you see on this stump from happening. My first stump lasted 18 years with no rot. I then moved it to a new space. Alas I left it. This one is only ~7 years old and was not tarred of backfilled with gravel. For warned is prepared.

If you want to see how I mount my post vice, let me know.

The first pic shows the length of my stump. Its buried to the light colored line around 18" from the top. This sets my anvil very close to knuckle height when completed

In The second pic you can see the notch at the top

Third pic shows the length of my anvil base. For reference its a 255# anvil.the light color shows how deep it was imbedded in the fine sand.

Pic 4 shows the width of the notch in the top of the stump. Notice its a close, but not tight fit.

Pic 5 shows the deapth of the notch. Adjust here to get your final anvil height.

The last pic shows the notch. Alas much broken off, but I think you get the idea. And of course, the shop dog.

The piece in the background is from my post vice.

Both now have a new home. Cribbing for moving my 5'×10'×1" tabletop.

Their final reward will be to warm me this winter in the shop!

Enjoy Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0273.JPG, Views: 49, Size: 455.86 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0270.JPG, Views: 53, Size: 368.86 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0266.JPG, Views: 47, Size: 491.23 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0261.JPG, Views: 49, Size: 304.28 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0260.JPG, Views: 54, Size: 389.79 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0255.JPG, Views: 53, Size: 421.88 KB
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Scrambler82
HR,

Did you put any type of strap around the outside of the GREEN block so as it dried it didn't split ?

I am just reading through all of the threads and came across yours and started thinking... "What will happen when it dries" !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Scrambler82
Anvil,

Did you do anything about strapping the block to reduce future cracking ?

[image] 

 Just thinking out loud !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Marc
I prefer steel tripods for anvils any day, to stumps. 
Currently working on a tripod stand for a Peter Wright engineering vice. 
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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theengel
Marc wrote:
I prefer steel tripods for anvils any day, to stumps. 
Currently working on a tripod stand for a Peter Wright engineering vice. 


Why?  

I've never tried a steel stand.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Marc
Why I prefer them? Much more stable with a wider base but let's you stand next to the anvil. You can beef them up as much as you like and bolting the anvil down is easier. No need to chase up logs that end up cracking and wobbling.

I was given a pack of 6"x2"x 1/4" RHS by a neighbour. Making a vice stand is going to be a pleasure. Fill the back leg for the vice with sand and soak the sand up with motor oil,  for counterbalance. For anvils I fill all legs with sand to stop the sound and glue the vice with silicone and bolt it down with 4 big bolts and a cross member on each pair of legs.  Have a 1/2" plate for the base of the vice. The plate for an anvil is either 3/4 or 1".  

I understand the use of a 18" post that is buried 2' or 3' in the ground in an area that has no termites. A good tripod that can be moved around at will and that is solid and heavy is my choice. But hey ... not saying it has to be that way, only that such is my choice. As a general rule I refuse to work on anvils or vices that wobble. [smile]
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Scrambler82
The only stand I ever used on an anvil was a Tree Stump, Uncle's Tools, it worked for what I did and I assume a wooden stand will work for me now but I didn't have a stump laying around so I used what I could get free, Construction Lumber.  This stand should work for me now and in the future.

Marc,
Just to compare:  (From a Novice's stand point, as solid as any stand needs to be).
1) My stand as built will be easy to bolt down; drill a many holes as needed in the base plate and go for it; three should do.  Mine is not the usual Wood Stump though !
2) With the curve in the center core of this stand, it allows me to get as close as needed, again not typical.
3) It is solid, with the Hammering I have done so far, it is as solid as I need it to be.

I am not the quickest person to get things done, one reason I can't make up my mine, the second is I need to determine what I like and what I don't about other stands I have seen, (takes time for me)  but because of my OCD I took my time making what I determined to be the right design for me; one that should out last me !  
I now have a stand the fits me, height (Thanks to Glenn and Thomas Powers over on IFI), and a design that allows me to get close so I do not have to bend over.

Yes... not a Stump Stand but made of WOOD and Steel !


20170827_112526_1503859938053_resized.jpg    


Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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mtforge
When I need a new anvil stand I buy treated 4 x 6 treated lumber, cut them to the length I want and run all thread crass ways to bolt it them together to support the base. Then chain the anvil down to it to help quiet it and hold it on. Three of my four work stations are done this way. 
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theengel
Thanks for all the info guys.

I actually have 2 stumps, stacked on top of each other unevenly, for my stand... which really sucks.

I'll work on actually putting time into making a stand when I get a real anvil.  For now, I'm using RR track.

Anyway, this week my cousin and I are cutting down a nice thick ash stump.  I'll be making myself a decent stand out of it... along with cutting down a bunch more wood to use as tomahawk handles.


Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Scrambler82
mtforge wrote:
When I need a new anvil stand I buy treated 4 x 6 treated lumber, cut them to the length I want and run all thread crass ways to bolt it them together to support the base. Then chain the anvil down to it to help quiet it and hold it on. Three of my four work stations are done this way. 


What about fumes from the Treated Lumber when it gets burnt from hot steel or slag ?

I always figured standard dimensional lumber would work out the best.

I got all of my lumber for the stand from Construction Sites, a lot of long cut offs that usually get thrown out !  If you ask, no donuts, you usually can walk away with enough to build what ever stand design you want.  I got a 6 x 8 Center and a lot of 2x12s, and a few 2x14s, free is for me ! 
there were a lot of 4x4s just laying around, I didn't want to get too much wood stock piled so 2x lumber was mostly what I picked up.
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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mtforge
"What about fuses from the Treated Lumber when it gets burnt from hot steel or slag ?"
Do you mean "fumes"? I don't pour melted steel on it and the scale from working don't make fumes. I have a gravel floor and didn't want the contact with the damp floor to rot the wood,
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Scrambler82
Just a thought !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Scrambler82
Hey Hank,

How's the "Anvil Stand - Stump" getting along ?

Did you get a band saw to dress her up some ?

Any new pictures ?

AND... where is your "Journal" ?
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
Scrambler, concerning banding. Yes I considered it. I chose to not do that. My first stump done like I showed was green. It lasted over 10 years with no problem and was coated with roofing tar when "planted.. It did shrink,,, and made a very snug fit for the anvil.

The abuse you see on the stump in the pics is because it had far too much dry rot in it and was pulled up and reset twice. In the last 8 years. The last time I moved it, it became unusable.
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Scrambler82
Anvil,

Ok on the banding and dry rot... just wondering !


Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
Scrambler82, I read your journal.

If you are setting up a permanent blacksmith shop, I strongly suggest that both your anvil and post vice be set up permanent on stumps buried securely in the ground. The "killer for both is loss of applied force due to vibration and/or any movement or bounce.
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Marc
I remember one time I was making a long railing, over 20m long out of SHS 25x25x2mm. 2.5m panels with a frame and vertical bars every 110mm alternating forged 12mm square bars with twist baskets, hammered bars and sections of SHS and the whole lot had to be texturised. I used a cheap mallet, drilled the face all over with different size drill bits and used it to hammer the SHS cold on all faces.  
Since I needed to swing around 6m SHS, I set up a little 40kg anvil outside. I had no stump outside but hat a piece of electricity pole laying around. It was a 1.5 meter length and some 300mm diameter that had survived the winter firewood chase since it was treated. 
I had just decommissioned a little outdoor spa, that was as useless as an ashtray on a motorbike. impossible to keep clean since it was sunken and level with the paved floor. I had smashed a few holes in the sides and filled the lot with sand prepared for paving over. Best place to sink the pole in and fit the anvil to it. 
I worked on that little anvil for a month or so until i finished the job. It was the sturdiest stump ever and because there was sand all around it it allowed me to vary the hight by kicking a little bit of sand under my feet and be lower or higher as I felt I needed to be. 
I always thought the best anvil stand should be variable, and for some time I was contemplating buying 3 bottle car jacks those with a screw not hydraulic and weld them upside down to each leg of the stand. Still thinking about that.

The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Hank Rearden
I'm still using the same stump with two 4x4 laid underneath the stump for proper anvil height. It's not perfect but it what I have for now.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Scrambler82
anvil wrote:
Scrambler82, I read your journal. If you are setting up a permanent blacksmith shop, I strongly suggest that both your anvil and post vice be set up permanent on stumps buried securely in the ground. The "killer for both is loss of applied force due to vibration and/or any movement or bounce.


anvil,

Not setting up a Permanent Shop, hobby work out of a new barn, and no Post Vice, I wish, thanks for the advice though.

Best case on the anvil being secured better will be four bolts through the base but I will try it out as is first !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
Actually, situation creates best.

Have fun
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Marc
Scrambler82 wrote:


anvil,

Not setting up a Permanent Shop, hobby work out of a new barn, and no Post Vice, I wish, thanks for the advice though.

Best case on the anvil being secured better will be four bolts through the base but I will try it out as is first !


One way to secure a stump made of lumber to concrete floor without it being permanent nor drilling, is to glue it down with construction adhesive like landscape  liquid nails, Sika or similar. Same stuff under the anvil will stop it ringing too.
You can do it this way ... take the anvil off, turn the block of wood upside down, apply a generous strip of glue all around. Then take 3 spacers that can be plastic or wood sticks or thick nails, anything that will stop the weight of the stump from squeezing all the glue out and place on the ground. The next day you pull the spacers out and plug the holes with some more glue. If you a worried about springiness you could place a 1/4" plate under the stump and glue all around this time no need for sticks.  
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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theengel
Marc wrote:


One way to secure a stump made of lumber to concrete floor without it being permanent nor drilling, is to glue it down with construction adhesive like landscape  liquid nails, Sika or similar. Same stuff under the anvil will stop it ringing too.
You can do it this way ... take the anvil off, turn the block of wood upside down, apply a generous strip of glue all around. Then take 3 spacers that can be plastic or wood sticks or thick nails, anything that will stop the weight of the stump from squeezing all the glue out and place on the ground. The next day you pull the spacers out and plug the holes with some more glue. If you a worried about springiness you could place a 1/4" plate under the stump and glue all around this time no need for sticks.  


I might do that.  I had two logs stacked on top of each other that I was using.  My cousin just dropped off a bunch of logs for me, so I can make a new stand.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Scrambler82
Marc wrote:


One way to secure a stump made of lumber to concrete floor without it being permanent nor drilling, is to glue it down with construction adhesive like landscape  liquid nails, Sika or similar. Same stuff under the anvil will stop it ringing too.
You can do it this way ... take the anvil off, turn the block of wood upside down, apply a generous strip of glue all around. Then take 3 spacers that can be plastic or wood sticks or thick nails, anything that will stop the weight of the stump from squeezing all the glue out and place on the ground. The next day you pull the spacers out and plug the holes with some more glue. If you a worried about springiness you could place a 1/4" plate under the stump and glue all around this time no need for sticks.  


Morn'n All,

The gluing idea sound interesting Marc, thinking on it was wondering what would happen if you wanted to move it; will the adhesive release without taking the floor with it ?

Thinking further on drilling through bolts in the base, this type of mounting would be subject to vibrations and in turn may enlarge the holes in the Concrete, allowing the Anvil/Stand to move. Gotta think on it !

For what I am going to do I will try it out letting it just sit there and see how far it wants to move around.
My shop, although a good size is used for all kind of projects so moving things would be a good option.

Have a great day you guys !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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