Steve Meyer
Id like to start making some bottle openers.  I'm mostly stuck with watching videos to get a idea on how to do it.  And the ones I've seen show them using the horn of a anvil to shape the round section.  Anyone know how I could go about it without the use of a horn? Or have links to articles videos that would help me out?
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Matthew Shoemaker
If you have something to poke through the hole and form it, simmilar to a hammer drift, might get you the desired shape. Depending on the shape of your bottle opener you could squish it in a vice or just use some channellocks or vice grips to turn the circle into an oval. Same thing goes with just putting one end on your anvil and hitting the other to squish the circle out.
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Steve Meyer
I'll need to make a 1" drift or close to that I think.  thank you for the advice I can leave it in to use as a anvil for  shaping.
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theengel
Almost everything I have right now came from the rail road tracks down the street.  Aside from finding spikes, you can usually find a few of those metal plates that the tracks sit on.  They have nice, square holes in them.  I mounted one next to my anvil, and can use a RR spike to punch a big hole through steel.  I can also forge spikes into hardy tools and just set them right inside the square hole.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Steve Meyer
I have one of those I could use until I figure out how to get a hole into the slab of steel I use. If anyone has any ideas on how to clean out a crap ton of weld from the handle hole in a sledgehammer I could have some decent 1" round to make a drift. But I've had this big cross pean type sledgehammer for a long time so even though the handle sucks I don't want to cut it up unless I can get another handle on it.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
I'm not quite understanding what you're saying, Steve.

theengel wrote:
Almost everything I have right now came from the rail road tracks down the street.  Aside from finding spikes, you can usually find a few of those metal plates that the tracks sit on.  They have nice, square holes in them.  I mounted one next to my anvil, and can use a RR spike to punch a big hole through steel.  I can also forge spikes into hardy tools and just set them right inside the square hole.
You can also just use the edge, provided it's hanging over air, to drift the hole if those aren't large enough.
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Steve Meyer
Just meant without a horn to work the round edge and clean it up.  What would be the next best way to clean it up.  I dont want to squish the hole trying to clean up the edges of the opener hole after I drift it.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Hmm. Well, if you have a ball pien hammer, carefully maneuvering the piece around and hitting the inside with the ball end may work. But it's far from the most practical thing.

Perhaps you can clean it up with a round file.
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Steve Meyer
I may try that with the ball pien I have several different sizes of ball pien hammers.  I would file it but i don't relish the idea of taking the hammer marks away. Thank you for the ideas.
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NorrinRadd
If you have a vise you could forge a small bick to use in it. [df1dafd8fb688bae80be96d1a7c92705] 
How are you punching your holes?
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Steve Meyer
I have a few slot punches for holes. I still need to fashion a drift the right size though.  I could definitely do something like that for my vice thank you. I'm continually working on my little work space.
IMG_20170321_182406.jpg 
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Matthew Shoemaker
If you are able to, throw a piece of 1" square or At least 1"in length or width ( like a rectangle 1" by 3/4") length of stock into your vice and use an angle grinder to shape it down to however much of a taper you want. You could forge it down, but for the sake of time and materials, an angle grinder might be a good choice. The angle grinder may also give you more accurate of a taper and will result in a better finish. Also, if you dont have a swage block with different hole sizes in it, you could use 4 blocks of steel or 4 bricks (anything that you are comfortable to use as a support). You don't need an anvil for enlarging a hole, just something to put behind the piece to keep it from forming in a way that you dont want. With the four blocks, arrange them so that one of the side edges are touching from each block. Then, move them all slightly out to dilate the space between the corners, kind of like the aperrature on a camera. This will give you the ability to form any size of support hole that you need. You don't need proper anvil steel for this because the force is going from the hammer to the drift to expanding the hole outwards and some downforce( depending on how hot the steel is). If you were hitting straight down on it, than using normal bricks would not work because the force is too strong. You should probably punch a starter hole and make it about 1/4" to 1/2" diameter before starting the drift. You could drill the starter too, if you fancy spending the time drilling a half inch hole in steel

The included image is a keychain I made that I intended to be a bottle opener, but I learnt the hardway how stainless isnt the best material to forge and I didn't want to risk breaking the hole. The hole is square because my drift for right now is one of my dads old jackhammer bits.

Hope this helps!
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Steve Meyer
Thank you that is very helpful. I've been watching Alec Steele. he doesn't use a swage block but has a plate of steel with several different sizes of holes drilled through it, I wonder if that would work and also be a bit easier to make, or get  than a swage block, also a bit smaller than bricks?
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