Dustin Stephens

so i tried to stick a piece of 7/8 stock in my hardie this weekend as i was going to make a hot cut, no fit.  it was very very close but no cigar.  sooo, what size hardy tools do I need? I suck at a tape measure[smile]

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jmccustomknives
You can size your hardies by heating them and pushing them into the hole.  Every anvil is different.  My fisher is 1 1/4" the Eveson is 7/8".

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Scrambler82
New Questions,

I wondered about the sizing of Hardie Tool Shafts, if that is the correct term I read above thanks.

I measured the Hardie Hole in my PW, using Dial Calipers just to be safe, lol... one side measured 1" the other measured less, I'm voting on 1".

How will the Tail of the Anvil take to a piece of Hot Steel being forced in the Hardie... cracking that is ?

I read some posts on the subject and was thinking you just would bang it to shape until it fit... ?

Help would be appreciated !

Also, what about these purchased Hardie, when you buy a 1" Hardie Tool, do you need to resize the shaft by heating and shaping ?

Another Also..., I read about locking in the Hardie Tools with a wedge in the bottom of the tool under the tail, is this a good idea ?

There are so many different ways to build the shaft portion of the Tool, the one I thought was a good idea was the flat stock forming a loop with a little spring action to hold things tight.  This method would lend itself to a wedge under the tail but any thoughts would be appreciated !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Marc
Hand made anvils have hand made hardie holes that are uneven and of dubious measures. Sometimes you are lucky but usually you have to make your own hardies or fix the one you bought. The sides of the holes are usually tapered anyway so it is a pyramidal shape of unknown measurements. 
If you make your own, you shape the shaft close enough with the hammer and then force it hot in the anvil, and no it will not break the anvil if it is hot enough. Reheat after each hammering session and keep the anvil cool with water.  It will need to be heat treated afterwards. If you bought your hardy and it does not fit, I wouldn't forge the shaft or you lose the temper. No not yours, the hardy [smile]
Better to grind them to shape using blue dye to see where it touches the anvil and keep the cutting side cool by dipping in water from time to time. 
If it is too lose you have no choice but to re-forge the shaft by upsetting it and forcing it back in the hole. Than do the heat treatment again. 
I find it very interesting to watch you tube videos of experienced blacksmith using hardy tools that rattle and shake 1/4" side to side. Gives me the shivers. 
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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Scrambler82
Marc,

Thanks for the info !
Your thoughts on shaping first then heating and driving the shaft through the Hardie Hole, is sensible and I will remember it for future use.
The comment on the purchased Hardie, grind it to fit, I just thought you purchased to fit, I guess everything isn't perfect.

Thanks
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Mike Westbrook
I use Square PTO shaft from Tractor Supply for my Hardy hole stock it comes in 1/8 Inch increments and is 1045 steel so it's tough got 7/8 x 72 inch stick for 42 dollars and was able to make 12 tools from it I add a dot of weld to each side near the top and grind to fit my hole it is 7/8 but more like 1 inch up top that stuff also comes in rectangle for out of round holes but you can't beat it for the price
Facebook (South mountain metal works)
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Scrambler82
MW,

Thanks for the info.

I just went out on the TS Site, so I could Bookmark the item, but did not find anything under PTO Shaft, Square PTO Shaft, or even just power shaft... !  

Any chance that you would have the Link for the item you purchased ?

Thanks
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Mike Westbrook
Funny you say that I couldn't find it on tsc website either or I was going to post it you could just go to the tisco site and look also another site I love for odd stuff is McMaster Carr they have everything !!
Facebook (South mountain metal works)
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anvil
Marc wrote:
I find it very interesting to watch you tube videos of experienced blacksmith using hardy tools that rattle and shake 1/4" side to side. Gives me the shivers. 


true. a sloppy fit is the pits. If you make your own, then taper the shaft slightly and leave it just slightly bigger at the top. then a slight tap will fit it. The taper is critical. it keeps your hardy from getting stuck in the hole. it easily loosens with a quick tap from the bottom.

Also, as you noticed, your hardy hole may not be square, or may be worn and chipped near the top. A hot fit will match all this, so I make a center punch mark where I can see it to denote which side goes where.

here's a few suggestions on resizing the shaft.

if it's too big,hot file, file, grind, then when close hot fit. if you are worried about a tempered hardy, just heat the shaft, (local heat) and keep the rest cool with a wet rag, or dunking it in your slack tub.

if it's too small, then heat the shaft(local heat) then upset then hot fit.. use a sleeve made from square tubing that the id fits your hardy and the od fits the hole. cut the corners of the tubing and bend them out so they lay flat on the anvil face.

you can get the same effect with a piece of flat stock. make a right angle and only shim from one side. don't shim from the bottom, only from the top. otherwise it may get stuck and you can't drive it out from the bottom.

if it is just slightly smaller, duck tape works well, believe it or not.
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Scrambler82
Thanks Anvil for your suggestions, being new and not having much Hammer time, I would think a snug Hardy-Hole (HH) would be better; I steady tool should work better and safer.

The HH in my PW is a little over 1", and the couple of Hardies that I have fit loose, so I'm thinking a shim in the hole is the way to go, less part to lose.

I got some 5" long, 1" Hardie Shaft Stock, (if that's what they call it), from a guy on e-Bay, he gave me what I thought was a good price, honored Military (a plus), and got the goods to me asap, so I won't be buying any more HH Material for a while.  The fitment of the 1" stock is as stated, loose, 1 1/8" doesn't fit but could be hot fit if needed, but I will be trying the 1/16" Shim Stock, my only problem with this is how to hold the shim in place.  

I'm thinking there is a slight taper on the hole, not much but I will try to taper the shawm stock and see how it fits the hole and tools.

Also, using the shim stock might allow me the option of mounting positions, if needed !

I didn't start this thread but I have gotten a lot of good info about HH and fitment of the Shafts, thanks to all for posting.
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
I left out the best solution. Duck tape.

Yes, another life saving use for that magic stuff. It will work in any situation, but it works best if your "windage" is slight.
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Scrambler82
anvil wrote:
I left out the best solution. Duck tape.

Yes, another life saving use for that magic stuff. It will work in any situation, but it works best if your "windage" is slight.


WD40 won't work... I'm guessing  !  LoL !

I will try the Duck Tape, it will be easily applied, removed and applied again !

I am still working on getting Shim Stock, I'm thinking, and yes I do it too much, I want to make a square four sided shim, let's see where this goes.

All I need other than the shim stock itself is, being able to overcome "my procrastination" ! 
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
Lol, procrastination is my best bud!  
Speaking of 4 sided shims. Sometimes you can get lucky and square tubing will work. 
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