Scrambler82
I have found I miss use terms in Blacksmithing.

I use the term "Blacksmith" for the person hitting the steel, the area the person is in called the ""Smithy, the fire is called the "Forge", any thoughts ?

I find myself lost for the correct terms and don't want to appear anymore less knowledgable than I really am !

Can someone please straighten me out, here are three of the terms I need to straighten out !

What is the fire called ?

What is the person hitting the Steel called ?

What is the place he/she is hitting the steel in called ?

Feel free to add any terms that comes up, PLEASE !

Thanks for reading and post away !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
The fire is called the forge.
The person is the blacksmith.
The place he is forging is called the smithy, smithery, or shop. It changes on who is saying it, and they all pretty much mean the same thing.
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Scrambler82
Thks, if I make a piece in my Smith, is it called a Forging, a Forgery (LoL), a piece of formed steel ?

I am going to look that up "Terms for Blacksmithing" and see what comes up !

ltr
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Scrambler82
I found a site out there in Web Land, that has info and a test on Blacksmithing Terms.
I learned more than I thought I would with about two hours of playing their Testing Quiz.

If I run across it again I will get the address.



Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Hank Rearden
If two people are involved in the forging process at the anvil the person swinging the hammer is called the striker. The blacksmith is holding the top tool. and controls the process. Typically they work well together and know what each other is doing as though they were one. Not always the case.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Marc
The tradesman is the Smith.
He can be a Blacksmith, a Bladesmith, a Gunsmith, a Locksmith, according to what he is smithing. 
Forging is the act of forming something that is malleable. Fire makes the steel malleable (not the forge).
Forgery comes from forging, that is making something yourself that should be ready made by someone else. 
[smile]


The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Scrambler82
Thanks for posting, sometimes a newbie can get confused with the terminology and it applied usage !

Marc,  I always thought it was the heat that made the steel malleable not the fire... LoL, but I did like your explanation.  

To pull a spin from an old Si-Fi Movie called DUNE, "The Forge is the Fire, the Fire is the Forge" !


Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Marc
Well ... if you want to go into details, fire is rapid oxidation of fuel in the process called combustion, so it is the fire or if you like the oxidation of the fuel that releases the energy from the double links in O2 to the stronger links in CO2 and H2O. So the heat comes from fire, or if you want to go further back, from oxygen. 
The forge provides a safe place for the fuel to combine with oxygen and supplies a stream of oxygen to the fuel to burn. 
Of course you turn the handle so you could say you produce the heat by turning he handle ... or by paying the electricity bill for the fan to blow air etc. And if you think that electricity is mainly produced with coal, you have coal making electricity to fan your forge to burn fuel to produce fire and heat to ... etc. 
And if you are blessed with those wretched windmills to make your so much more expensive electricity, you have air in motion producing electricity to fan your fire etc etc. 

So ... what have you forged today?
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
(Or you have a gas forge.)
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Marc
So what produces heat in the gas forge? ... mmm ... the Venturi effect that sucks oxygen inside the forge? [smile]


G
lossary of Blacksmith terms.
I had never heard of an "Anglesmith" before ...

http://blacksmiths.mygenwebs.com/_glossary.php

The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Scrambler82
Marc wrote:
Well ... if you want to go into details, fire is rapid oxidation of fuel in the process called combustion, so it is the fire or if you like the oxidation of the fuel that releases the energy from the double links in O2 to the stronger links in CO2 and H2O. So the heat comes from fire, or if you want to go further back, from oxygen. 
The forge provides a safe place for the fuel to combine with oxygen and supplies a stream of oxygen to the fuel to burn. 
Of course you turn the handle so you could say you produce the heat by turning he handle ... or by paying the electricity bill for the fan to blow air etc. And if you think that electricity is mainly produced with coal, you have coal making electricity to fan your forge to burn fuel to produce fire and heat to ... etc. 
And if you are blessed with those wretched windmills to make your so much more expensive electricity, you have air in motion producing electricity to fan your fire etc etc. 

So ... what have you forged today?


I agree with you as far as my knowledge base goes !
I have never stated the my forge is up an running, have I ?  I have said I am working on it and I move slow !
Sorry if that disappoints you.


As far as knowing heat I have heated a few pieces of steel in my earlier years before moving into engineering.


Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Marc
No disappointment necessary. All in good time. 
Are you planing to build a coal or gas forge? Or buy one? 
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Scrambler82
Morn'n Marc and the Site,

In Amateur Radio, I as many, are called "Appliance Users", because we buy our equipment and don't find an old one and rebuild it.

To answer your question, "Are you planing to build a coal or gas forge? Or buy one? ",  I purchased a Gas Forge from "Diamondback", looks good, it is the 2-Burner Blacksmith Version and Dennis is easy to work with !
In my vigor to get the stand put together, I tripped while carrying the forge and dropped it, the forge plumbing hit the edge of me Welding Table and cracked the gas feed fitting and broke some f the lining, and then in my wisdom I didn't look to see how to take the plumbing apart, nor did I ask Dennis, and I damaged the cross tubes.
I am now waiting for pieces from Dennis and hoping to get things together soon.
I ordered a new Lining Kit and Dennis threw in the Cross Tubes and a drill, just in case... for free !

For me Life gets in the way all the time, two new granddaughters, a wife that want the new house DONE NOW..., remodeling of said house, building a new barn/shop, planning the front and back yards, patios/walkways and outdoor kitchen...  as you can see the Honey Do List is a long one.

I am slower than most in my approach to all things, (OCD, ADD, PTSD) I do what I can !

Thanks for asking and here is a picture of the PW Anvil on the new Stand (Not finished - needs Tool Rack under the heel and 2" Receivers under the horn) and the Forge on the new stand (almost done) in the background.

The short block in the front is the original stand for the Anvil but it is a little too short for me.

20170827_112526_1503859938053_resized.jpg 
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Marc
Nothing wrong with buying new tools and use them. Blacksmithing, contrary to popular belief, is not being a curator of a museum but it is metalwork, the key word being work.

When I found a job at age 15 in a smithy it was a job. Not even a fancy one and I wasn't particularly proud of what I was doing. I realised later that there was something interesting in heating metal and shaping it with the hammer, but it still was work done with tools we bought in the hardware store. I found the work done by the owner, and old Italian smith amazing, and thought it was something I could never dream to reproduce. Things changed and I learned a bit more, yet I still consider making a hammer or tongs a forge or God forbid an anvil, a royal pain in the neck and a colossal waste of time. To me the value in blacksmithing how I understand it is in the artistic creation and not in the industrial activity of making what could be bought from a store.
I think that old anvils are not better because they are old, quite the contrary, and in general old english anvils are pretty crappy compared with continental anvils, and some of the new continental anvils are way better than any old english anvil you can think of. A rusty decrepit forge with a hand crank blower is a pain to fix and a pain to work with, electric blower is ten times better and gas forge 20 times better.
In my personal opinion of course.
[smile] 
Bad luck with the forge. Hopefully you can fix it soon. Renovations ... I have a blast doing renovations, have been renovating for the last 20 years home and holiday house and still at it. Keeps me alive. Have to find the balance of work, renovation and hobby. A balancing act. That is life [smile]

The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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