Hank Rearden
Well our vacation continues and it rained pretty hard today, so we hit the road and headed north to Lewes NJ. We parked to walk to historic downtown and when we came back to the car I relized I parked in ftont of the towns Blacksmith Shop. How Cool was that. Unfortunately the shop was closed, so I didn't get much more than these pics..  However many homes had placards on the saying something like Daughters of the Revolution Historic preservation. Many of these homes had the blacksmith made latches and door hinges and hardware. Many had iron gate. So I can see a demand for the Preservation Forge services.

preservation forge 1.jpg 


preservation forge.jpg 

preservation forge 2.jpg





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2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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RobWilson
Interesting Hank , its nice to see the old ways kept alive . Were are you going on your travels ?  

I am just back from travelling around  Europe , well I have been back a week . My question is do you or any of the other lads take photos of old iron work when travelling ?  

I do , Railings ,hinges ,locks ,machines all sorts of things ,,,,,,,,,the wife thinks me quite odd at times [rolleyes] ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,maybe I am [biggrin]



Rob 
  
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jmccustomknives
Rob, I can't speak for Hank as he in in the NE which does have some older archatecture.  Here in the deep south of the U.S. things don't get a chance to get old.  Heat and humidity degrade the stuff real quick.  The oldest house I've seen here was built in the early 1800's.  Old by our standards but in Europe it's just a baby.  Plus we here in the states didn't have a lot of fancy architectural blacksmiths, especially in the deep south.  Our smiths didn't focus on one item like their European counterparts so they never got fancy making them. 

I do have a little collection of "found" iron.  It has been very educational to study those items.

Recently one of our Safety guys came back from Europe.  He was showing our secretary pics of his trip.  He was telling her about this astronomical clock he had pics of made in the 1600's.  He looked at me and said, "You of all people can appreciate this"; and never showed it to me.  [confused]

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
Well I can tell you this about my family vacations. I do look for things the rest of the family groans about. I love old iron. By that I mean old cranes, cable shovels, machinery and trains. A few years back  we crossed a bridge in Cape May NJ and there was a guy taking a cab off a travel crane and attaching it to a barge. Next morning I was in the marina snapping pictures. He came to chase me out, But I told him I was admiring his handy work. So he took some time to share some stories, showed me the dredge his father made in the 30's from a model A pickup truck. Way Kool. He told me Government folks from labor and industry regularly hassled him about his projects. He said they were for his use and to butt out. I guess his family was dredging the channel before anyone thought up any of the government regulatory agencies. I liked his can do attitude. I'll see if I still have one of those pics and post it
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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RobWilson
jmccustomknives wrote:
Rob, I can't speak for Hank as he in in the NE which does have some older archatecture.  Here in the deep south of the U.S. things don't get a chance to get old.  Heat and humidity degrade the stuff real quick.  The oldest house I've seen here was built in the early 1800's.  Old by our standards but in Europe it's just a baby.  Plus we here in the states didn't have a lot of fancy architectural blacksmiths, especially in the deep south.  Our smiths didn't focus on one item like their European counterparts so they never got fancy making them. 

I do have a little collection of "found" iron.  It has been very educational to study those items.

Recently one of our Safety guys came back from Europe.  He was showing our secretary pics of his trip.  He was telling her about this astronomical clock he had pics of made in the 1600's.  He looked at me and said, "You of all people can appreciate this"; and never showed it to me.  [confused]



Hi James ,,,,,,,,,,, I had a preconception that the South would have been were the arty ironwork would have been , just shows I am wrong again lol . Over here its everywhere and more so on the continent allot of the old styles are reproduced .

The county I live in has ruins going back to Roman and Medieval times , Castles and stately houses , the birth of the railway,iron rails, ,hydraulic machinery , hydro electricity ,electric light bulb ,steam turbines you cast help but trip over industrial history [smile]   

There was a book about American Ironwork I was looking into ordering from the USA  ,but for the life of me I cant remember the tile [rolleyes] , anyway its seamed to have some very detailed ironwork in it .


Rob       
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jmccustomknives
Rob, that book may be "The Contemporary Blacksmith".  I do have that book, there is some really nice work that dates back into the 1800's.  Most of our most ancient ruins are by the native mound builders.  And they were stone aged.

A few years ago I did a festival at one of those sites.  They let me in because bladesmithing was something that was introduced to Native American culture.  lol.  It was pretty much a bust for me.  That festival is focused mainly for children, they can't buy knives.  lol.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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RobWilson
Hank Rearden wrote:
Well I can tell you this about my family vacations. I do look for things the rest of the family groans about. I love old iron. By that I mean old cranes, cable shovels, machinery and trains. A few years back  we crossed a bridge in Cape May NJ and there was a guy taking a cab off a travel crane and attaching it to a barge. Next morning I was in the marina snapping pictures. He came to chase me out, But I told him I was admiring his handy work. So he took some time to share some stories, showed me the dredge his father made in the 30's from a model A pickup truck. Way Kool. He told me Government folks from labor and industry regularly hassled him about his projects. He said they were for his use and to butt out. I guess his family was dredging the channel before anyone thought up any of the government regulatory agencies. I liked his can do attitude. I'll see if I still have one of those pics and post it


Hi Hank ,,,,,,,, Me and the wife have an understanding ,,,,,,,,,,,,I go by myself ,she goes shopping LOL ,  no I must admit she dose indulge in my museum adventures .

Is this the sort of thing your into ? steam shovel and crane at an open air museum just down the road from me .



I just love old iron [biggrin]


Rob 
 
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jmccustomknives
You guys would love the Tannehill Iron works outside of Birmingam Alabama.  Lovely little museum.  Got all kinds of stuff like that as it is dedicated to the ironworks that was there during the War of Northern Aggression, or better known as the Civil war.  They came in and burned it down.  But I digress, there's a lot of old equipment, steam engines and memorabilia.  Next time I'm up there I'll get some pics.  I love the old steam engines.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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RobWilson
Ok James ,,,,,,,,,,,,,how did you do that [confused]  get post #6 in between my posts ,I am sure it was not there yesterday lol .

I think the book I was looking at was three books in one , something like that .

Any way I dont have a copy of "The Contemporary Blacksmith" but its on my list now , as I do have decorative and sculptural ironwork by the same author Dona Z. Meilach and thats a cracking book to have on the shelf  .


I googled "Tannehill Iron works "   ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,right up my street is that [biggrin] , I just love line shafting , one day I would like to tour the USA may do a fly drive holiday .


Rob 

PS , sorry for dragging your thread OT Hank [wink] 

 

 
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jmccustomknives
I don't think Hank minds.  Although most guys that do the "fly, drive" holiday don't come to the deep South.  [wink]

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
Yep that's the kind of stuff. Growing up I played in a flooded rock quarry in Rolesville N.C. from time to time. Maybe I should say explored.  It's amazing I'm survived my age of stupid. I've been fascinated since I can remember; face shovels, cranes and hoes etc... Excellent pics. Thanks Rob.
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2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Matthew Shoemaker
If only it was not very expensive to get anvils that size that's hanging out front of it
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Hank Rearden
Met John today owner of preservation forge. Smithing for 40 years. I'm standing in the spectator area of his shop. Great conversation.

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code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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