Skarzs the Cave Troll
Well, I've been batting the idea around to start a topic on here with pictures of my projects, and what Yesteryear said in one of his topics got the decision made. So, here are some of my best projects; I obviously won't show them all, though.
WP_20150405_001.jpg
Fish-handle fillet knife and small knife for my sister.
WP_20150226_008.jpg  First attempt at a bowie.
image.jpg 
Bowie-ish knife for my cousin.IMG_0070.JPG
Franken-mascus fighter style knife.   IMG_0994.JPG 
Rose made for my grandmother.
IMG_0974.JPG 
This was a knife from a video game I made for a friend. I have a series of videos on my channel: Cave of Skarzs.
braided.jpg  IMG_0358.JPG  These were left overs from my demonstration at a private school.  
IMG_0363.JPG Dagger made from 1084 that I hadn't worked on for around two years. Handle is red mahogany.     
IMG_0369.JPG 
Lastly, here is a. . . sword thing. It's a design I made myself, and it is quite effective at cutting away brambles and limbs. It is made from a leaf spring, and the handle is bloodwood.
Cave of Skarzs
Quote 0 0


Yesteryear Forge
Nice work
Really like the forged elements and the last photo of the sword thing.
I have never forged a knife but I have made 50 or so knives by the metal removal process ( being a machinist before delving into the blacksmith trade )
Give out before you give up - if it was easy anybody could do it
Quote 0 0
Yesteryear Forge
Made those in the late 70s and early 80s
Give out before you give up - if it was easy anybody could do it
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Thanks!
I like forging to shape because I just don't like grinding. xD
Quote 0 0
NorrinRadd
Great stuff Skarz!
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
I made a poppy-like flower recently, more of an artsy thing than what I've usually shown.
IMG_0453.JPG 
It was inspired by the way Technicus Joe on Youtube made one.

Here's a video I made on the making of it:
Forging a poppy- design by Technicus Joe.
Quote 1 0
Metalmelt
Lots of good stuff there. Nice job on the dagger.
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Thanks.


Here's a new project. Just a v-block hardie swage. Took a couple hours to make, and I think it turned out alright. 
[20160719_181310_zpsas6suwvd] 


A video of me doing it.
Quote 2 0
Hank Rearden
Nice job. I really enjoyed watching the video of making your V block hardy. That was a lot of work and can't wait to see more
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Thanks! It may have been hard, but it was really fun!
Quote 0 0
Dominic
I'm currently working on a batch of stuff for a craft fair thing.
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Cool. Would love to see it.
Quote 0 0
Dominic
I will have to show you when I come over.I was thinking while I was over you could teach me to forge a rams head.PLEASE!!!
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Well, I'm certainly no expert, but I'll see what I can show you.
Quote 0 0
Dominic
Thanks.What is franken-mascus?
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Oh, it's just a name I thought up to call damascus that was made from random steels.
Quote 0 0
Dominic
Ok I see now.
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Hey, all, finally got out to my forge again to make a tool that's kind of necessary for me right now, but I didn't feel like spending the money. (Little bit ironic since they're dirt cheap, but oh well.)

This here is a weld chipper or chipping hammer for knocking the slag off of arc welds. NorrinRadd made a video about the same project quite a while back, and it inspired me to make mine.

Differences: I made it from two railroad spikes, the handle is elongated parallel to the chisel points so it doesn't twist in my hand, and I made a loop on the end so I can hang it if need be.
Quote 1 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Hey, this was a fun project I helped Dominic with.
Quote 0 0
Dominic
yes it was indeed very fun and i learned alot.
Quote 0 0
Hank Rearden
Nice.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Hey, all. Got another video made. (Finally.)
Feel free to tell me what you think!


And to those who don't have the free time to watch a twenty-four minute video. . . I basically used a very large bearing race to make a knife. Straightened it out, cut it in half, forged the knife with an angled tang (to get a flare on the butt of the handle), and put on a brass bolster with bloodwood handle scales. I think it turned out rather nice.
Quote 0 0
jmccustomknives
Good looking knife.  those races are challenging. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Little bit, yeah. Thanks.
Anything you can critique, James?
Quote 0 0
jmccustomknives
Handle looks real good.  I'd say use it, and use it a lot.  If there are any design flaws using it will find them. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Thanks!
Quote 0 0
Anna zhao
Nice job ,I like it  .
Quote 0 0
angela Shen
Skarzs the Cave Troll wrote:
Hey, this was a fun project I helped Dominic with.

sincerlly i think you need a power hammer for your forging[smile][smile]
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Hello, it's been a long while, hasn't it? [frown] 
Well, here's another video of mine. 


To anyone who wants specifics, here is the process I used.
I drilled holes about half an inch into the face and horn of this cast iron anvil, all of various sizes, but large enough so that I could weld all the way to the bottom.
Bevelled edges and ground off the coating.
Preheated to about 200-250 degrees Fahrenheit. 
Welded holes up, and made two passes of regular mild steel MIG wire. High heat and high wire speed for heavy buildup. This cast iron wasn't the cleanest alloy, being a pretty cheap gray cast iron from China, so I think it had some silicon in it, causing some porosity in the welds, though not enough to ruin the integrity of the welds. Would probably benefit from using special wire for the first pass.
After these two passes, I stacked on some half inch round mild steel rods width-wise across the face, and welded those in completely. Enough space was allowed for full penetration.
The horn was made round, and given a proper tip. Some material was added around the base to increase stabilization.
I added on this amount of steel because I figured it would help prevent the cast iron from breaking out on the corners, like what happens on a lot of Vulcan anvils, which are steel-faced cast iron anvils.
Bevelled the edges and flattened the face relatively level; it was unnecessary to completely finish the face at this point.
Preheated to 200-250 degrees Fahrenheit.
Welded on the hardfacing MIG wire I bought. This was a flux-core H12 alloy, and was specifically stated to be good against impact; some are more rated against abrasion, so it would be good to check with the specifics before buying these wires. It was a surprisingly hard face, even at the temperature it was at after all the welding. 
Ground flat, square, and even using a seven inch angle grinder with a cup wheel on it; these wheels are incredibly useful for making sure the surface is kept flat. "Polished" with a sixty grit flap disc.

Starting weight: 55 pounds
Ending weight: 62 pounds.
Time of labor: Four hours
Materials cost (including anvil): $140
Total estimated cost: $220

So, because this was a first attempt, the cost would not be what I would necessarily want it to be, coming out at a little less than $4 a pound. (Oof.) However, this is an estimation, and a higher-end estimation at that. I didn't actually buy this anvil, so the cost for me was lower.
This anvil is very usable, though. It has about 75%-80% rebound, which is something some forged anvils can't even boast. The face is almost as hard as a file (though only slightly softer), and I believe it shall be a good tool for when I need a small anvil like that.


If there are any questions, ask away. 
Quote 0 0
Hank Rearden
Just saw your knife. Nice and clean. Like it.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
Quote 0 0
Scrambler82
I just watched you Hardie Tool Video and found it very interesting, good to see it being done, give a person the feeling that  IT CAN BE DONE !

Also, your cut off Hardie used in the video... it is a Half of a Hammer or Ax, I was wondering about doin the same thing with an old Cross Peen hammer I have, good to see that also.

Thanks for posting. 
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Glad someone found this entertaining, at least. 😉

Yeah, I was given that cutoff. I don't know how they sawed that sledge into pieces, but they found a way. 
Quote 0 0
Scrambler82
Skarzs the Cave Troll wrote:
Glad someone found this entertaining, at least. 😉

Yeah, I was given that cutoff. I don't know how they sawed that sledge into pieces, but they found a way. 


I watch more than I talk about, I did like it with the forming of the Stake portion, you got the basic configuration you wanted then got it hot and hammered it into the Hardie Hole for finished shape.  I did notice, before you said it, that the heat had gone to the anvil around the Hardie, and then you said it... !
I liked that fitment method, something to think about.  
I was thinking of buying some of that 1" Stock from eBay, states that it is used for Hardie Tool Stakes.

Anyway gave me something to think on.

Cutting the hammer head..., is the hammer head hardened all the way across. I was hoping when I attempt to cut in the center I would find it softer middle portion where the handle goes through.

My Tool for that cut was going to be a Chop Saw with a Carbide-Toothed Blade, I may need to get another blade, that is if I wreck the one I have.  I can always go Abrasive Blade, wondering if they make an Abrasive Blade for hardened Steel ?

I already wore one carbide tipped blade out through general use, it took a while but it still wore out and I don't think I cut anything too hard.  I can't locate anyone to resharpen it, maybe it was designed as a throw away.

We will see what happens.   If I remember to take a picture or two of the Cutting, maybe try a Video, I will post.


Keep posting your videos, I enjoy them.

Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
Quote 0 0
Skarzs the Cave Troll
Will do. I have two in the making.

Abrasive discs will cut through hardened steel. It takes a smidge longer, but it will do it. At work we have to cut through some steel that is a little harder than mild steel, and it dulls our steel cold-cut saw when we try to use it on them, so we have an abrasive chop saw for them.

Alternatively, you could just stick that in the fire to soften it.
Quote 0 0
Scrambler82
Skarzs the Cave Troll wrote:
Will do. I have two in the making.

Abrasive discs will cut through hardened steel. It takes a smidge longer, but it will do it. At work we have to cut through some steel that is a little harder than mild steel, and it dulls our steel cold-cut saw when we try to use it on them, so we have an abrasive chop saw for them.

Alternatively, you could just stick that in the fire to soften it.




Thats good to know !  My Saw takes both kinds !

The cutting harder metals or something you didn't think was hardened, the toothed blade tends to get very slow and that is how I ruined my last blade.  I hardened some steel while bending it, didn't think it would happen.  When I started cutting it wasn't too bad but then things slowed down quickly ! 
At $65.00/ea. on the Toothed Blades I will be using Abrasive Blade for a while and the toothed blade only when I know what I am cutting.

Also, I thought the Cold Saw wouldn't have had a problem with hardened steel, another misconception I have been living with !  LoL !

Thanks, waiting to watch !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
Quote 0 0