Hank Rearden
Hello everyone. I have a question about repairing the mushrooming on a hammer. I picked up a few tools that have a good amount of mushrooming on them. (see pics) I was wondering if it is a good idea to heat them an try to reshape the striking end instead of just dressing them with a grinder? What about temper?

mushroom flatter.jpg      mushroom flatter 2.jpg 



mushroom flatter 2 1-2.jpg  



  mushroom flatter 2 inch.jpg   
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
Those aren't hammers, they are flatters.  They are set on the hot work and struck with a hammer to smooth and flatten the work.  That's why the mushrooming is only on one end, the end that's struck.  I would dress them, as far as temper goes they will work harden.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
Yea I know, I was generalizing. I have a few hot cuts as well. I thought that there may be a benefit to reshaping the striking area. I haven't really seen the issue addressed. First thought was there is probably stress cracks that would create a complete failure if I tried to reshape the head. Although I thought it might forge weld those stressed area back together. I was hoping some one might have tried it successfully.
???
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
with old tooling like these the struck area can work harden and sometimes through off sharp chips that can find their way to eyes or other sensitive areas.  I've not run across any flatters, but if I did they would be welcome in my shop.  As far as forge welding and reworking it would be possible but unnecessary.  Hammers are easy to find, flatters, not so much. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Ohio Rusty
I have a couple tools that were mushroomed badly. I used an angle grinder with a 4 1/2 inch metal cutting wheel to cut away all the overhanging mushrooms metal away from the body. You can't get it all perfectly flush, so I rough ground off the remainder overhang with the edge of the angle grinder.
Then to true up the edges of the face and smooth them I used my belt sander with a 220 grit belt.  I also keep my belts that have hardly any grit left. They are practically smooth. Those belts are perfect for smoothing/polishing of the face and doing the final radiusing of the hammer face all around so there aren't any sharp edges.
Rusty Nitsch
S.E. Ohio
The Ohio Frontier Forge
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anvil
I usually hot file the splits off and bring it down to where I can forge the rest back into the struck end. Re heat treating is usually not necessary on these old tools. Keep the working end cool.
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mtforge
Yes, repair the edges. The possibility of chips flying off is enough to keep the edges clean. I grind or sand of the mushroom and add to the height as needed with a new section electric welded on. It's not worth it to me to forge weld it. I also keep it soft so it won't chip as easy. I would rather clean up the mushroom than pick shrapnel out of my body.
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anvil
Of course with new bought old tools, this doesn't apply, but once dressed and "in service", it's far better to redress the mushroom before it gets out of hand and rolls and splits.

The roll and splits make cold shuts which will chip off.

If you don't wait til it reaches his point, it's quick and simple to reforge the struck end and keep the working end cool.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
One smith I know, when dealing with a tool is similar condition, simply heated up that end and hot cut the mushrooming off.
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anvil
I've done that as well, but I try to conserve material when possible and forge the non split or cracked back into the hammer.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Depends on how much you want the tool, I guess. It wasn't the only one of its kind at the shop, so it wasn't necessary to preserve the material, I guess. And it's still fully functional, just about half an inch shorter.
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