Jacob Elmslie
hi, i recently acquired a post drill press.  Since I am adding a jacobs chuck and losing 3 inches on the column i wanted to replace it with some bar stock. only problem is so far all ive found is tube steel from home depot. will this work? or will i end up having distortion problems, im not sure how much pressure is actually exerted from this machine. is a smaller champion. Also i question whether to paint it, or oil it? I might resell this one since i have a slightly larger press that i could use. This one when i found it was all rusted over and seized up. its amazing what a little work can do, looks almost newish, except for some flash rusting giving the metal a goldish sheen from removing of the vinegar bath. thank you.
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Hank Rearden
Hi Jacob, Thanks for the kind words.

I suppose if the tubing wall is thick it would work okay. One of the characteristics I noticed when I clean my column was it wasn't perfectly smooth. Almost a spiral wave wrapped around the column: if you can imagine that. My initial though was it helped the work table clamp grip the column. You might check eBay from time to time to see if anyone is parting out a post drill.

I like the oiled look as well. There are some formulas online that help it last. One drawl back is the oil does attracts dust. I opted to paint. I used Rust-oleum Sun Rise Red and Oiled Bronze to paint my press. It chips easily but, a quick shot from the can and I'm good to go. If I used it everyday I would oil it. Note: WD-40 isn't an oil.

If you're up to it you can create a new topic and make a post showing your restoration. Let me know if I can help.
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Jacob Elmslie
These are the as found photos. I got the pair of these guys for $50, a nice rare find for me! The drill press was heavily rusted and seized at the screw drive. the auger has some of its own issues and am trying to figure out what to do wit it.

I took it apart, (thank God for vise grips, wd-40 and soft hammers) wire brushed all the parts and placed in vinegar for some time. one part i left in for a few days which was too long but it was having trouble getting clean. gave an outer layer a really soft hard cheese texture that i then used steel wool to get away. Although it worked great i had trouble with flash rusting while drying. So i used more steel wool to then re-clean each part and then wipe with denatured alcohol before painting. I think next time i would use a powered wire brush if possible. each part was carefully taped off and painted individually. and then reassembled.


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The outcome! turned out really nice and I love the way the paint feels on the metal, so smooth and silky. Now with one swift crank of the handle it will continue to spin for another 10 -1/2 revolutions. i kept the original face plate bar as I don't think the one I got will be sturdy enough. all the white residue you see is a general white grease 9lots of grease!). I replaced the chuck with a 1/4" jacobs chuck. if i keep it on there i will need to trim the arbor. If anyone has suggestion on how i can repair the original chuck id like to know! there are 2 holes at the top that looks like i need a special tool and then could possible wrench it apart? seems look really tight on it. the disc and 3 teeth inside are all mixed up, but all there with springs. i also repalced the lag bolts with stainless steel. it was missing some so i thought if im gonna replace i might as well do them all. i opted not to paint the table and put a layer of grease on it. pretty muhc all bare metal is preserved with grease except i only wd-40 the lower bar so far. any comments and suggestions greatly appreciated! i may do this with my other press, the only problem is that the shaft coupling to the drive screw is glued tight. thank you!

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Jacob Elmslie
one other question i have is, to get the pin out that keeps the drive assembly from just turning in place i had to cut a part of it to punch it out. now the pin really only goes through half the screw drive and not back through the other end of the piece. I really dont think this would be a problem would it? all it does is make it so it stops turning and instead rides the threads....
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Hank Rearden
Hi Jacob, You did a great job on your drill press. I'm not sure of the pin your referring to that you had to cut and punch. Can you take a close up pic so I can better identify it?

As far as the chuck I used a Jacobs as well. If I use an original bit it drills on center. However, the shaft on the Jacobs must be a few thousands smaller in diameter. When a use the Jacobs chuck with a spade bit you can see it rotate  slightly off center. Hasn't really effected and thing I test drilled. To remedy this I'm going to add shims to the opposite side of the shaft from the set screw face. I'll probably use an old feeler gauge to do this. Otherwise I like the chuck.

You might be able to adapt a chuck from a old hank crank drill, if your unable to repair the original chuck that you had on your drill. By the way nice two speed drill at that.

  
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Jacob Elmslie
so here there is a pin that goes down to a channel to keep that part of the assembly from turning, thusa activating the screw drive forward. to get it out i had to cut under neath it, and punch it out thus shortening the pin. now it works but the pin only goes to the mid point of the shaft. 

i wish it were 2 speed but no! I still have yet to test this out, will be drilling out the tab on the chuck key and mounting it on a tether as soon as i can find it!

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Hank Rearden
Okay I see now. Were you able to disassemble that bearing? The threads might be reverse or left instead of right handed threads. From the look of it the brass collar will probably have two fiber halves that allow the spindle to rotate while keeping the spindle connected to the feed screw. If the pin is long enough to do it's job (preventing the thrust bearing from becoming over tightened) Then I guess it's okay.

Your two speeds come from the two handles. The one on the right is high speed, The handle connected to the counter weight is low speed. You'll have to crank the left handle in the opposite direction though. That allowed the operator the greater variety of options to do his work.  Not all drills have this feature.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Jacob Elmslie
oh ok cool! i was wondering what the left handle was for i thought it seemed superflous. 

yeah I was able to get it all apart. i wasnt commenting on the 2 pins that keep the shaft connected the feed screw, i mean that 1/8" hole is a long pin that keeps the feed screws from turning around endlessly without lowering, the pin stops the sideways motion causing the screw to lower the shaft. im not worried about it. i think its fine and if ever an issue an easy fix. there is also a slight wobble to the flywheel but i guess its not an issue

thanks for the comments!

and now to  restore my other press. (same model type but a few inched bigger, no handle for the flywheel) just got it apart but will have to replace the brass cover for the shaft pins on this one. someone over extended it and crushed it.... had to chisel it off. much better condition this time really just needs to be wire brushed, painted and lubed i think.
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