jmccustomknives
So here's a wild hair I've been kicking around for a few years.  A san mai blade done with cable and a carbon steel core from a Nicholson file. Got it welded up tonight.  We'll see how this one works out.  That's a 10lb hammer if your wondering.  [cool]

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Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
I was wondering if you've tried to twist a billet instead of folding. This might be a candidate.
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jmccustomknives
I love twisted billets.  The idea behind the san mai is you put a high quality knife steel sandwiched between springy steel for toughness.  This kinda fits that as the cable is very strong for Damascus but I'm looking to really boost the edge holding and make a real cool effect.  Twisted billets do need a number of layers to become interesting.  In my opinion you should have at least a 40 layer billet to start with 160-200 being optimum. 

This is a blade that had 80 layers when I started twisting.
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Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
I'm posting these pics as I go.  Hope it doesn't blow up in my face [mad].  The billet was drawn out then shaped.  Since the effect I want will only come about by grinding the rest of the way will by by stock removal.
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Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
IMG_0571.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
I shared your blade that that has 80 layers before twisting on facebook. Great design! I should be at the fire tomorrow. We'll see how it goes. 

Could you fold your San Mai billet, shaping it out rough. Then taking a separate billet, one you formed from like a cable with different strands of metal. In other words make a cable out of different strands of metal. Hammer weld it into a smaller billet, twisting it tight several times and folding it into the blade edge of the first billet. 

You could add a tougher steel into the second billet to add hardness into the edge. What a cool effect to see a tighter design pattern near the knife edge.

I hope what I described makes sense.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
I don't see why not.  One can do anything as long as they have the will, skill and equipment to handle it.  Just remember, when forging out knives from differing carbon content alloys the carbon wants to move from the high carbon steel to the lower carbon stuff.  It is much like a dry sponge and wet one, set them on top of each other the water will soak into the dry sponge.  This carbon migration can turn a blade from a usable carbon content steel to something sub-par.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
I'm not really liking the way this one looks.  Kind of clunky, interesting pattern though.  009.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
Here's another attempt at the san mai, this time I used a smaller cable and some band saw blade between the 1095 core and the cable to add a little more definition.  007.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
Crazy pattern. The 1095 core makes up the edge?
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
Yes, the 1095 is the edge material.  The scale looking stuff is the cable, with the other material in between the 2 is band saw blade.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
God that second San Mai done.  Cross cut handle scales are a challenge.  [eek]
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Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
That's got a real nice look to it. Have you tried to etch a makers mark or your logo? Combination sabre spear point with wire stripper and skinner features. Good all around.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
I coat the part of the blade that will be marked with wax then scribe my initials in the wax.  Then I use a salt water solution and a computer power unit to electro etch it.  This process works well, but Damascus, especially cable tends to hide it.  I haven't done that to this one yes.  The "wire stripper" at the back of the blade is called a choil.  I prefer to put them as it makes sharpening much easier keeping the blade from bottoming out against the stone.  The choil also helps prevent the blade from dishing out.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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