Jacob Elmslie
screw press 4.jpg
  
I have wanted a fly press for a very long time. but mostly they are a little out of my range, but this beauty came my way and now I am looking to see just what it can do. 

screw press 3.jpg 
No makers marks, or estimates on age, its just exist as 382 lbs of steel and bronze. It has a 2" screw that raises up 3/16" and a 26" diameter ships wheel. the wheel and screw weigh 47 lbs.  The table is about 15 x 16 inches, with 10.5" daylight from the face to the top of the screw opening. I calculate it should give a 435:1 mechanical ratio minus friction. So with a good stand, I could easily crank 100 lbs of force making this a 20+ ton press. The trick is reducing the friction and making a ram for tooling. 
  
It almost looks like the table could be removable to allow drifting as it looks like the table has a giant plug that fits into a round opening for the screw press, but as is, its pretty snug in there and I am not sure by what means if not just from corrosion.  screw press 1.jpg 

I am looking for ideas and sources for super heavy duty thrust bearings and how to mate it to the domed end of the screw with keeping as much of the 10.5" daylight as possible for work space. 
screw press nub.jpg 

I am going to need some machinist help with this but I envision 2 plates at the top of the screw arm, with 4 channels for alignment rods, that will attach to the ram. the ram will need to house a thrust bearing and have plates to catch the top of the nub for raising the screw ram. 

screw press design.jpg 
I am not sure how thick the ram will need to be, or widths yet, I am off to the drawing board but taking suggestions. I also am not sure if I will use a hardly like shank opening for tooling, or try to save space by bolting them to a wider face plate. 


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jmccustomknives
Nice.   I watched a demo where a guy used one of those.  Should be a good tool to have.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Mike Westbrook
Like a ball joint press you could drill into the domed end install one large ball ( bearing ) and make several dies to fit up inside then you would only need two guide rods for less friction either way cool find
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Jacob Elmslie
@jcmcustomknives   that's good news to me, what did the smith do with it? I got it not really knowing if it would have forging ability, or was something like a beefy arbor press for a machinist or like a hydraulic shop press. Idealy I want it to work like a hydraulic forge press to make damascus steel, and flattening, but with a few more applications using the table for bending jigs, texturing plates etc.... I don't think it would do much drawing out very easily without a lot of time inefficiency but still maybe better than I could do on thick stock by hand.  

@mikewestbrook   I am not too familiar with ball joint presses, do you know any examples I can study? when I search for that I get tools for car repair. I was thinking I might have a machinist lathe out a seat for a thrust bearing If I can find out small enough and strong enough to take up to 40tons. What i like about your idea is that it goes into the screw leaving more room for work space. As for guide rails I like 4 but I don't see why 2 larger ones wouldn't work either, all it needs to do it keep the ram from torquing once it has made contact and it has to compete with the friction of any bearings.  

Thank you
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Mike Westbrook
It is an automotive tool I'll take a pic of mine apart tomorrow basically the screw is drilled a large ball inserted and a die with an external spring clip to hold it in is inserted the ball is the thrust bearing my otc model only has a 1 inch acme thread and it's rated for 40 tons you would honestly only need the guides to keep say a fuller centered you could just use a flat die with a spring fuller and eliminate the guides but I think fly presses are best for chisel work anyway are you going to place a coil spring and thrust bearings between the ships wheel and arbor so it returns to top that would be nice it's a cool old peice either way
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Mike Westbrook
Here's a picture of it
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Jacob Elmslie
thank you, it almost seems too simple...  so when clamping down on that thing, the ram end does not rotate on the work piece because the friction on the bearing is less than the grip on the work piece to the tool end? and that little one is rated for 40 tons? (any chance if that is static vs dynamic loading?) is the inside socket for the bearing like a drilled out cylinder or rounded concave dome? (same with the tool bit end)


Thank you, this could work much better because of simplicity, probably cheaper, and allow more work room.

I am not sure about a spring to have it bounce back, (in a fly press it already does this due to the momentum but a screw press does not have much) I haven't seen that in any other designs. it has a very acute pitch to the threads so would take a really strong spring to push up on the rotational forces. A spring twisting used as a rotational devise might do that though.  With a flick of the hand without any tooling though it rotates pretty effortlessly and smooth. just at small increments 

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Mike Westbrook
The die and socket are concave to accept the ball I've used about a four foot cheater bar on it with no rotational issues ...finer threads would be stronger much slower with less travel but hold up well I believe.....your probably right about the return spring though
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Jacob Elmslie
thanks for your input mike, this may be the route I take, I just need to find a qualified machinist and get a quote. 
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