Hank Rearden
I've seen simple stumps to cast iron anvil stands and custom made stands with extras. Share what you use to hold your anvil and why you like it or what you would change if you could.
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NorrinRadd
Finally got some tool holders on my stump.
Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20160118_185559.jpg, Views: 21, Size: 1.74 MB
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Skarzs the Cave Troll

I show my anvil at 0:37.
The base is pretty solid, and it removes quite a bit of the ring from the anvil. Unfortunately the type of wood I use splits kind of easily, so I'm reluctant to make any sort of tool holder on the sides. I would like to stake it to the ground, but at the moment I'm still getting my forging area situated (it has changed from in the video), so I'm gonna have to deal with the occasional traveling anvil. Other than that, it works great for a 100# guy.
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Hank Rearden
I got a new stump for the anvil. I plan to shape it with the chain saw. Add angle iron to the corners so it makes adjusting the height possible. I'll sketch a few pics to get your ideas. Still without a computer.
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Hank Rearden
My neighbor had a few maple trees felled. Beside picking up firewood I set aside a log for a new anvil stand.
I plan on using the chain saw to shape the stump with a four sided taper. Angle iron on the corners and set at the proper height.
This weeks project. Click image for larger version - Name: 20160229_171632.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 2.39 MB
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Or you could go at it with a wedge and sledge. 

Saw a blacksmith's demonstration anvil (might have been his shop anvil, not sure), but it had everything he needed for simple demonstrations strung up on the log it was on. And it was interesting because he had it raised up on four little legs so he could get his feet underneath if he needed to, getting closer to his work rather than leaning over a wide thing. Quite a good design for a log stand.
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SW Reynolds
BSing stuff 003.jpg
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
What's the weight and make?
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Hank Rearden
My neighbor cleared away the vines to reveal this gem. Face is very clean. Doesn't look like it was hardly ever used. The question is; is this a repair or was it built for a specific application. Hay Budden Click image for larger version - Name: 20160814_182723.jpg, Views: 88, Size: 468.61 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20160814_182741.jpg, Views: 79, Size: 381.61 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20160814_182729.jpg, Views: 65, Size: 273.37 KB
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Anthony San Miguel
Looks like a Hay Budden that broke at the waist where the tool steel top half was originally forged welded to the wrought iron bottom. 
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jmccustomknives

Anthony San Miguel wrote:
Looks like a Hay Budden that broke at the waist where the tool steel top half was originally forged welded to the wrought iron bottom. 

ditto

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Yeah, I've seen other anvils break at the waist as well. I reckon the ring on that thing is pretty bad what with those legs being made the way they are. 
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Hank Rearden
Yeap, I believe you're right about it breaking at the waist. If that was my original and bullying that happened I'd be extremely upset. I just thought that maybe it was an application for maybe mounting on a truck or you're in a ship or something like that. I'm not sure mysrlf. The man is quite the prolific gatherer of Oddities. When I see him out next time, I'll ask him if he knows the history.
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Dominic
Here's my makeshift stand and cast iron anvil. Click image for larger version - Name: 1471628478126-1259394426.jpg, Views: 52, Size: 495.94 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 14716286078451098233189.jpg, Views: 51, Size: 504.64 KB
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Cool! It'll do well for now.
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Dominic
Yep its ok,but I can't wait to feel the differance that it makes having a steel anvil.
The rebound on this one sucks!
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Yeah, gotta get a steel one.
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Dominic
Yep still deciding over a steel anvil and a 2 by 72 belt grinder.
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jmccustomknives
Dominic wrote:
Yep still deciding over a steel anvil and a 2 by 72 belt grinder.


Well, that decision really depends on what your focus is going to be.  If you want to do knives then get the grinder, you can make the blades by stock removal.  It's better to learn that step first anyway, your going to grind regardless.  If your more focused on smithing then the anvil.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Bubba682
I used a red maple stump cost me 20.00 its heavy  it works great. Click image for larger version - Name: 115.JPG, Views: 48, Size: 225.90 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 170.JPG, Views: 53, Size: 311.66 KB
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Lefty Dave
I used a black cherry stump from a hedgerow tree on farm.

i" deep cut done with router.   Added fine sand after setting anvil in cut out.

I may add a hammer/tool holder like shown above.

If I did this again, I would cut 2" deep and put 1" of sand before setting anvil on stump.    Click image for larger version - Name: Stumpa.JPG, Views: 55, Size: 114.98 KB Click image for larger version - Name: Stump1.jpg, Views: 56, Size: 152.42 KB Click image for larger version - Name: Stump2.JPG, Views: 54, Size: 132.78 KB Click image for larger version - Name: Stump3.JPG, Views: 53, Size: 110.52 KB Click image for larger version - Name: Stump4.JPG, Views: 50, Size: 127.17 KB
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Hank Rearden
Lefty Dave and Bubba682, That stump looks real nice. Cutting a recess makes sense to hold the anvil in place.
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anvil
Lefty Dave, nice. That's how I do mine as well
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Scrambler82
Mine is built out of construction lumber gather for free at building sites, gotta luv FREE !

Steel Plates were extra pieces from my Uncle years ago.

Not done yet but getting there !

20170827_112526_1503859938053_resized.jpg 

The Old Stand I got with the Anvil was too short and sits next to the new one, the Wife has an eye on the old one, for what... don't know but I really don't need it in the shop anyway.

Used a similar method as Lefty and probably others, easy way to level things out... better than a grinder and 20 grit discs.
http://www.theironforgefire.com/post/wooden-steel-anvil-stand-9283131?pid=1301916007


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GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Scrambler82

My stand has progressed a little, too many Honey-Do things to do !

I added some metal straps to tie things together, everything is screwed together at the moment but all seams from top plate to bottom will be welded making it a one piece frame.
Not the cleanest thing but it is heavy and sits solid, don't have any idea of the weight of the stand alone but I have trouble moving it !
Any guesses on the weight... I know no way to tell !

Also added the Anvil Hold-Downs !

20180727_071251.jpg 
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GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Mike Westbrook
Here's my old girl with the little bickern I made sitting on 240 lbs of sand housed in a box made from angle and 2 inch thick oak sawmill boards the sand really helps dampen the sound alot Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20181006_134340160.jpg, Views: 23, Size: 4.32 MB
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Scrambler82
Interesting look, I like the design... as a Novice that is !

How did you support the wood on the sides ?


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GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Mike Westbrook
The wood is glued and drilled then nailed into a box the angle is welded all around the wood box so it and the 240 lbs of sand don't walk off need to make a little bigger plate under it on top of the sand after awhile the sand creeps up but after using a tippy stump and a steel stand that walked across the floor I love it
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Wayne Coe
I like a 3 legged anvil stand with the face of the anvil at wrist height.  The 3 legged stand is always stable, like a milking stool (if any of you youngsters know what that is).  Also with the 3 legged stand you can stand up close to it and stand up straight so that your back doesn't ache after time at the anvil.  I like a heavy stand and calk the anvil to the stand with a good adhesive calk.  If you have a 100# anvil and a 100# stand you now have, effectively, a 200# anvil.  The calk also dampens the vibration and quietens the ringing.  You can put any hammer or tong holders on as you wish

Let me know if I can help you.

Wayne
Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 waynecoe@highland.net http://www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com
 706-273-8017
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Scrambler82
Mike Westbrook wrote:
The wood is glued and drilled then nailed into a box the angle is welded all around the wood box so it and the 240 lbs of sand don't walk off need to make a little bigger plate under it on top of the sand after awhile the sand creeps up but after using a tippy stump and a steel stand that walked across the floor I love it


OK, thanks...

The side wood looked like the sand was the only thing holding it in place... so I had to ask !

Stand looks good !

Ltr


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GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Yves
I like the sand box.

I also use one made of folded and welded 1/4" plate. The anvil is 275lbs.
The alternative to getting old is not interesting.
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GrumpyBiker
I used pressure treated 4x4s lag bolted & glued together.
2” steel banded held in place with more lag bolts.
Angle iron on the top edges for protection from the material hold down chain.
Coated in boiled Linseed oil.


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[IMG_9022]

[18D08401-096B-4D5B-B6A2-6D4BAD781355]

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Mike Westbrook
I like that weighted chain hold down guick with minimal contact
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Galt's Glutch Forge
Thanks for sharing. Like the radius edge of the anvil. I did the same to my anvil as well.
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Scrambler82
I understand the rounding g of an edge on the edge for forming steel but I was wondering if it helps with chipping ?
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GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Puuurrrrddyyy. I like it.

Though I know some certain men who would have your hands for welding on that anvil. [wink]
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GrumpyBiker
The factory this anvil came from welded the 1/2” mounting plates onto it.
It was then welded to a metal anvil stand.
They cut the bracket & sold the anvil.
I decided to weld onto the remnants of those brackets to make my own mounting brackets.
It’s rock solid and has made it very quiet.
I took care not to weld to the anvil and cause more damage.
These plates were a negotiation point for me.
I was going to grind them off but decided to just use them.
I honestly have come to like that they’re still on the anvil as it hints back to its origins.

Post wire brushing....

[IMG-8868]

[IMG-8875]

[IMG-8878]

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Marc
i would have ground them off, but come to think of it, there is nothing wrong with welding an anvil in place.
Unusual but practical, even when a tad radical. 

Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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Scrambler82
To me, a Newb, what it done is done, the welding and its use is part of the Anvil's History.

I like the stand, first off it is wood, no really but close to what WAS used... Wood; next you made it, nice !

Grumpy Biker, ( I used to ride back in the 70's) got married and never rode again.  The Wife even wanted to get a bike but the prices caused me to lay back some.

You said "Boiled Linseed Oil", when you build the oil does it come up darker or black ?  Why I ask is your stand appears to have a darker coating on it.  I have never done a coating like that on wood so I am up in the air on this method.

Also, I must have missed it, what is the weight of your Anvil ?

Also, just wondering, your bench, butcher block style, it looks like it is 2x stock on edge, what is it made of ?



Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Marc
Boiled linseed oil as opposed to raw, is not something you do yourself ... although you could. The purpose is to get started the oxidation process so that it dries quicker. 
The black on his 4"x4" timber is burned.
To get the wood to look like that, it is called charring and you do it with a flame, propane torch or similar. The conifers have soft growth rings and harder winter rings. The burning takes more on the soft wood, yet when you are done, you can scrape it with steel wool and take the charred part off the softer wood revealing the lighter wood underneath. The harder rings remain dark and so you get that effect. You can burn it much more and then you have an effect like driftwood when you scrape the charred off. Very nice and very messy 😉 
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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GrumpyBiker
My anvil is a 160lbs Arm & Hammer (1918).
Boiled Linseed Oil can be bought at Lowe’s or any decent hardware store.

[IMG-8887]


My assembly table (I’m a wood worker who’s dabbling in Blacksmithing) was made from 2x4”s on end, glued & screwed together. Belt sanded smooth and stained.

[7A9F10A7-87CF-4590-AE13-D33BC9300DA9]


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GrumpyBiker
Marc wrote:
i would have ground them off, but come to think of it, there is nothing wrong with welding an anvil in place.
Unusual but practical, even when a tad radical. 




You know when I found this for sale & saw it for the first time I was irritated that someone would do this to an old anvil.
Then I realized it wasn’t done to an old anvil it was done to a tool, just another piece of equipment in the eyes of the company.
I couldn’t make up my mind until the last minute.
I now find it interesting, not how I would have mounted it originally as I don’t like molesting my tools but it’s rock solidly mounted now & the old man once again gets put back to use.
Kinda like the hand powered benchtop drill press on the back corner of my assembly table.

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bigphotog
This is not a anvil but my striking  plate...I made it with a replacement top and it is attached to a steel plate that is lag bolted to the wood stand. The steel bace has a hardy hole plate welded to it. The stand is of scrap 4X6 popular beams that were free.  It is now bolted to the floor and a little more worn. It’s great for hot cutting and when a softer striking surface is needed. 
I also have a small 35lb forged anvil and recently acquired a 65lb Badger that I restored.79D8F993-DA5F-4D8B-8C24-766488B2DF12.jpeg  57C30B00-E65F-42A8-AA08-1291065A0FE2.jpeg  50444D01-AADC-4772-A17F-425F04E1E927.jpeg  EA9E83C9-54AB-4396-A06C-D9A0820DAD03.jpeg
Forgot to add that I’m experimenting with a 3M high impact automotive adhesive with this and is the reason for design and for the top plate being bolted to the bottom plate not traditionally welded.
I wanted to see if I could come close to a forge welded top to bottom piece.
I used 3M 07333 epoxy.
its pricy and the special applicator costs from $50 and up. A friend owns a auto body shop so I used his equipment/Supplies for the test...
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Marc
GrumpyBiker wrote:



You know when I found this for sale & saw it for the first time I was irritated that someone would do this to an old anvil.
Then I realized it wasn’t done to an old anvil it was done to a tool, just another piece of equipment in the eyes of the company.
I couldn’t make up my mind until the last minute.
I now find it interesting, not how I would have mounted it originally as I don’t like molesting my tools but it’s rock solidly mounted now & the old man once again gets put back to use.
Kinda like the hand powered benchtop drill press on the back corner of my assembly table.



I bought an anvil once, in a very expensive suburb and asked the owner how he came by this anvil, considering the houses in that area are 5 millions and up and clearly no one is smithing anything. 
He told me that when he was 15 a friend of the family asked him to "get rid of this anvil for me" ... whatever that meant, no explanation given ... so he hid it in the family garage, covered it with a tarp, and it remain there till the day I bought it from the guy now in his 60 ties. 

The anvil had a name and surname stick welded to the side in large characters. 
I was thorn between leaving it as you say "history", or removing it. 
Considering that the story and name if believed, hinted to something of dubious origin .. or not, who knows! ... and even when I had paid and hold a receipt for it, I thought that it was wiser to clean the name off the side with a flap disk. 
The anvil did not mind one bit and is happy to work for me anonymously. 🙂
Much that passes as idealism, is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. Bertrand Russell
 
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anvil
bigphotog wrote:

Forgot to add that I’m experimenting with a 3M high impact automotive adhesive with this and is the reason for design and for the top plate being bolted to the bottom plate not traditionally welded.
I wanted to see if I could come close to a forge welded top to bottom piece.


One thing to consider is that the top piece will change its cross section the more you use it. This means that the two pieces will no longer be flush with each other. A friend and I discovered this when he was refacing a badly delammed old anvil. The choice was a perimeter weld or a plug weld. We went for a plug weld and got 100% penetration. We did this a long time ago, and his son still uses it as a full time smith.  

If the 4 holes are bolt holes, even glued, this might happen.  Just something to consider. ( I just noticed they are mounted with lags.) 
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bigphotog
Thanks for the info.
the whole thing was and is a experiment and I was really curious about the strength of the so-called structural epoxy that Ford is gluing it’s new aluminum trucks together with! So if and when I experience any of the problems you brought up I’ll redo the plate and just go with a solid pice of steel. I always keep my eyes open for scrap that Might become something useful and I’ve already found a 6 inch thick pice of steel that’s close to the footprint of this plate...

I have a feeling that the bace will outlast the striking plate. But for now it’s doing the job.
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