Btolle

Hey everyone,

I'm new here and I'm looking to start a small business supplying cheaper, quality anvils and tools. I am testing this industry with a simple yet pivotal part of every smiths shop, his anvil. Below are the specifications of the striking anvils, I am also looking at making a solid stand as well so there is no need to scrounge around for a stump or craft your own base for the anvil. The anvils are made from A36 steel plate, non-hardened, they will have a waterjet cut 1 inch hardy hole and they will be selling for $150 each. Still designing the stand for these so I don't have a price for them yet, but the legs will be pre-filled with a sand/oil mixture to deaden the sound and vibration. If you want a stand we will weld it to the base to eliminate the need for that step.

I am a blacksmith hobbyist myself and I have looked online for something like this for a while now and never found them so I figured I would try and supply. It is so hard to find a quality striking face for beginner blacksmiths or hobby blacksmiths. 

Please leave me feedback, I can change anything about these anvils right now, as I am in the planning phase of this still. Constructive feedback is highly appreciated. With my metal supplier right next door to my shop I can get these cut and shipped in a week.

 

Striking Anvil

A36 Steel Plate

12 inches long X 5 inches wide X 2.5 inches thick 

 

Thank for your time.

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Btolle
Sorry need to clear something up, I will only be selling and shipping these within the united states. 
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jmccustomknives
That's pretty cool.  You might think about having them cut from AR plate since it isn't near as soft.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Duce
Pictures or a drawing would be welcome. <>< Duce
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Btolle
I will put together a drawing of the stand and anvil, Ill check the AR plate as well for price difference, The A36 is pretty hard compared to other anvils of the same price range. If you ding it up just reface it with hard facing rods and it will be stronger then AR steel would be in the first place. But ill look into it today and get back to you guys with pics and numbers. 
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Btolle
I've had quite a few people asking about getting a harder steel so there is not as much deformation should you mis-hit. I can make these out of AR400 but that will bump up to $250 per due to the increase cost in the steel plate. I was shooting for the $150 range for beginners and teens and lower budget individuals but if this sounds better to any of you please let me know as the AR400 is much harder, it is not tool steel, but it can take quite a bit more abuse. 
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jmccustomknives
You should think about taking them to a blacksmith's meeting like Tri-States.  It's a good time to have this product as a lot of young smiths and newbs out there looking for anvils. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Btolle
Thank you for the suggestion, I have been thinking the same just haven't had time. To be honest I'm hitting all the forums probing to see what the demand for something like this is. So far I have had a lot of people telling me they are interested, so I'm almost to the point of putting in a steel order and whipping up the first batch. 
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Metalmelt
The A36 is only about 21 Carbon and 90 Mn. It won't harden much. If you could get some 1040 steel it would harden much better. Should be much more expensive since it's just 40 carbon and 1.00 mn, or there about. Expense would come if you got into Vanadium or Chrome alloys.
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Btolle
A lot of people I know do not use hardened anvils due to the fact that if you mis-hit and glance your edge you can have a fragment moving at deadly speeds. It is also harder on your tools if you are training anyone and the mis-hits are much more frequent. However, I can look into the 1040 and see how much of a price difference there is and I will post my results come Monday. 
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Btolle
Striking Anvil V1.jpg  Whipped up basic dimensions in CAD for easy veiwing. Still working on getting the base into CAD.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Awesome venture you're looking into, man.
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Btolle
Just trying to provide a cheaper anvil for either new guys or a cheaper striking face for experienced guys looking to save their anvil face. Thanks for letting me post on your forums you guys have been awesome with the suggestions
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Btolle
Here is a video on the striking anvil that Alec Steele uses and makes as well. For those of you who have never seen them in use.

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Btolle
Ok, update, this is happening. Cutting and fabbing the first anvil and base this week so I can get pictures uploaded to my website. Getting all the legal stuff for business out of the way this week as well. Will have the first batch ready in three weeks (3 weeks). As soon as the website is ready I will post it so everyone can see exact product and dimensions. Thank you all for the support and constructive posts. I am very excited to get these rolling and start getting other high demand products to the site as well. 
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jmccustomknives
Good luck!

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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anvil
Mild steel is completely inappropriate for an anvil. It's too soft and can't be hardened.

From a new guys first miss blow, this piece of mild steel is well on its way to the scrap yard.

If you have any knowledge of the properties of steel, you will know this is truth.

If you have no knowledge of the properties of steel, you shouldn't be making tools like this at all.

If you do know about steel and are selling these, well,, it's your morality.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
A striking anvil isn't used in the same way as a regular anvil. It's not supposed to be used with a hand hammer, where you can really control your work. It's supposed to be used with a sledge hammer for heavy work, or for making hardy tools. Speaking from experience, the edges around my hardy hole on my regular anvil are now tempered because I was trying to make a hardy tool in that. Using the striking anvil without worrying about the hardness can save the hardy hole from softening like that on my good anvil.
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Btolle

Hey everyone,

Sorry about the lapse in news as to this project, had some life issues come up and it put a major damper on this, however it is finally ready. Below is my website, if you have any questions please e-mail me, input is always welcome as well. Thanks for being patient guys.

Ben

Hammer Time Smithy Supply

http://www.hammertimesmithysupply.com

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anvil
Skarzs the Cave Troll wrote:
A striking anvil isn't used in the same way as a regular anvil. It's not supposed to be used with a hand hammer, where you can really control your work. It's supposed to be used with a sledge hammer for heavy work, or for making hardy tools. Speaking from experience, the edges around my hardy hole on my regular anvil are now tempered because I was trying to make a hardy tool in that. Using the striking anvil without worrying about the hardness can save the hardy hole from softening like that on my good anvil.


I certainly don't agree with you. If you let the area around your hardy hole get hot enough to change the temper, then you screwed up. That means if you saw any temper colors running,,, starting with a light straw, you blew it!

Second, your anvil face is hardened for a reason. That is to keep the face flat and clean. One missed blow or even a good healthy blow on mild steel with a hammer will change the face. Just try hitting any size mild steel with any hammer and see the results.

You are far better off saving your money and buying the proper too. In this case a swedge block. It's far more versitile

If you need to know how to forge the hardy shank using the proper shapedhot cut, the edge of your anvil and a 4# and a 2# forging hammer,,, let me know.
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Metalmelt
Btolle wrote:

Hey everyone,

Sorry about the lapse in news as to this project, had some life issues come up and it put a major damper on this, however it is finally ready. Below is my website, if you have any questions please e-mail me, input is always welcome as well. Thanks for being patient guys.

Ben

Hammer Time Smithy Supply

http://www.hammertimesmithysupply.com




What grade steel did you end up using? Will you have an analysis available?
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Btolle
Hey Metalmelt,

I ended up using A36 for the block, I have done a rebound test with my hammers as well as with a ball bearing and it rebounds but only a couple inches because its a mild steel. I have thought about getting a tool steel 01 or A2 plate probably 1/2" thick and welding it to the top for the guys looking for something heavier and harder, but i do not have a way to forge weld it on, so it would only be welded along the sides and with the mixing of the too qualities I'm not sure how much abuse it could take before you start to get stress cracks in your welds. I have been using my first prototype for a few weeks now and yes it dents if you miss but because of its thickness the dents are very minor. In my opinion the dents have no effect on your project, it does not even dent 1/32" deep, the block will not bend even under heavy abuse, and I have yet to meet a smith that can beat steel into SHOW quality shape on any anvil without hitting a grinder or belt sander to clean up bevels and edges anyways. 

If you want any other kind of analysis or test let me know. These things are awesome. Once the legs are filled with sand there is no ring at all and the total weight is 94 lbs, if you add oil to the sand you can get more weight obviously and avoid rusting but that's up to you. I changed my design from my website a little and turned the feet in to minimize footprint, it makes a big difference depending on your thread length on your bolt tails coming out of your concrete. 
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Metalmelt
You might think about putting the bolt tabs to the inside of the legs so they aren't sticking out to trip over. Might make it harder to tighten bolts but you only do it once.
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Btolle
Yeah thats what I was refferring to above, here is a pic of what they look like now I just need to take some pics and swap them out on the website. The anvil is not welded on yet in this pic.IMG_0566.JPG
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Hank Rearden
Nice. Bringing it from idea to completion. Good job. Now the hard work begins.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Metalmelt
Oh, I missed that. Looks good but now it's pigeon toed. [biggrin] [biggrin] Like me.

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Btolle

So on all forums I've had a lot of guys wanting a tool steel working surface, so I looked into welding an O1 tool steel 1/2" plate on the top of the A36 block which would add 10lbs to the overall weight. However, this will add $200 to the total cost, this stuff is expensive, i don't have a problem doing this but I will need orders already placed to cover the extra expense, because it's really hard to stock these if noone will buy them because of the higher price. I will update the website with pricing and options, If this sounds interesting to any of you who are interested in buying one please let me know and I can get these ordered.

I have only priced out O1 so if any of you would like a different tool steel then let me know, I can also look into AR400+. 

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jmccustomknives
Here's the problem with welding a plate, it must be completely fused.  If it's just welded on the outside the inner portion will be "dead".  In other words the face would have been better off without it.  Ar plate is marginally better.  A steel that work hardens like 4140 would be a good choice since it is heat treatable but if it wasn't one could still see performance improvements with use. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Btolle
Thats why I said let me know if you guys are interested because I cannot forge weld them to the top of the A36.
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angela Shen
mmexport1499322285270.jpg dies 
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Scrambler82
Btolle,
Looks good from a Novices prospective, but the prices a little stinging.
I noticed you sell the top plate separately, that brings things into prospective, and the buyer can made a stand wither steel or wooden.
Nice work.
 
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Hank Rearden
How are the sales going?
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Btolle
Hey Hank,

Been a while since I have jumped on the forums, sales are decent, I've sold 12 full builds so far. Shipping still sucks because of the shape and weight, but I've got it down now. Haven't had any bad reviews, everyone has been very pleased with the product. I have been using my own for forging hardy tools and some small knife work and I have no complaints. It is very solid, very quiet, and the dings and dents due to mis-hits on mild steel are very very small and don't affect my work at all. I sell about 1-2 a week, but that is also without me going to blacksmith meets or festivals or anything to advertise my products. Unfortunately my day job keeps me pretty busy so I don't have time to do that currently.
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Scrambler82
Btolle,

Good to hear they are selling and that someone is making money !

I have Bookmarked your sight, if, in the near future, I need either a new Anvil or (my big need) Hardie Tools, I will be in touch !

Please make sure to post what you will be selling for Hardie tools and if there is any discounting for Military or The Iron Forge Fire Site !

If your Hardies turn our as well as your Striking Anvil they should be a nice tool.

Just a thought, too long as a Quality Assurance Engineer, your Site's pages appear to dark to me, hard to read, IMHO you need something brighter !
This is not meant as criticism, just a thought.

Thanks,
Scrambler82



Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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theengel
This is the new millennial type website, where they assume everyone is reading with a phone instead of a computer.  he he

What I was glad to see, was that he was allowed to post this here.  I've seen many forums where someone comes in with a product that many visitors would want to hear about, and is not allowed to post... it's marked as spam.  In fact, I've seen where someone tries to do research for a product (as Btolle did here) and still get booted for spam, even though they didn't actually try to sell anything.

Another reason I like this forum.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Btolle
Hey Scrambler82

Thanks for the feedback on the website, it is a bit dark, I messed around with it for a while and I am going to redo it soon, or at least lighten it up a bit. 

Theengel,

Thanks for the reply, I am also very appreciative of this forum allowing me to post here, I have been kicked off of two forums because I "didn't get permission to sell on their forum" even though it never said anything about asking for permission upon joining and the admins said if they aren't getting a cut then no posting. Was pretty irritated about that but I guess everyone wants a piece of the pie.

The website was built and optimized for Windows on PC, I hate how it looks and operates on mobile devices, but I haven't had the time to delve into that aspect of the website yet. I tried to keep the website as simple as possible and as neat as possible. Only two main pages and 4 sub pages makes a very clean website compared many online stores that walk you in circles and you have to use their search engine to find anything. 

If there is anything that you guys like or don't like about the website then please post it and I will take all of your comments and remake it to better suit everyone likes. Please keep them constructive thanks guys.
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theengel
I'm just joshing about the site.  I've been a webmaster for the past 15 years.  One of the sites I manage has decided they want to go with the 'newer' look.  IE - minus the side menus.  So it's goofy battle I'm having with a client.  Or maybe I'm just getting old and don't like change.
Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?
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Scrambler82
Btolle wrote:
Hey Scrambler82

Thanks for the feedback on the website, it is a bit dark, I messed around with it for a while and I am going to redo it soon, or at least lighten it up a bit. 

Theengel,

The website was built and optimized for Windows on PC, I hate how it looks and operates on mobile devices, but I haven't had the time to delve into that aspect of the website yet. I tried to keep the website as simple as possible and as neat as possible. Only two main pages and 4 sub pages makes a very clean website compared many online stores that walk you in circles and you have to use their search engine to find anything. 

If there is anything that you guys like or don't like about the website then please post it and I will take all of your comments and remake it to better suit everyone likes. Please keep them constructive thanks guys.


Btolle,

I found your Site hard to read so I thought I would say something... !

As far as building your web site...  just a THOUGHT... again !
Why not have someone build it for you, someone that has experience in Web Site Structure ?
They just know what people like, what works and what doesn't.  In the long run it will save you time to build your stuff, it will not only run better but will be able to be fixed faster because of known structure and may or may not look better.  Most of the smaller Web Designers will tell you how to add to the Site, change a thing r two on your own, and by asking them about it you stay within their Web Structure and easier for them to step in if necessary.
The end comes down to how much you want to spend but now-a-days it isn't as expensive as you might think and IF you are running a business the expense is a write off and a professionally built sight gives a better impression.

Me thinking out loud gets me in trouble, most of the time, just a little brain storming on my part !

Good Luck with your sales, hope the business builds to a point you need to hire strikers.

Ltr
Scrambler
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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anvil
Btolle,. Congrats.

I was thinking, you might try Rob Gunter's super quench on these mild steel striking anvils. It is inexpensive and will harden mild steel good enough to keep the dings out.

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