Hank Rearden
Hello Folks,

I was recently asked about member "titles". So this post covers the topic briefly to explain the assigned names.

Based on the number of post your membership on the forum is given a title. When you sign up you're automatically assigned a title as an upsetting member. After you post your fourth post you'll become a drifting member. Below are the rest of the title names with corresponding number of required post.

Upsetting member 0-3
Drifting member    4-30
Striker member     31-60
Fullering member   61-75
Swageing member  76-100
Forge Master          101-200

If any member has another idea let us know.

P.S. Update your profiles and complete them as far as you're comfortable. If you need help with an avatar I'll be happy to help. Just pm me.

Best Regards,
Victor AKA: Hank Rearden
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
After forge master, the rank should be -  "Dude, get of your computer and make something".  lol.  I'd drop the upsetting member, it may make guys think they aren't welcome. 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
I was thinking the same.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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Metalman
Hank Rearden wrote:
I was thinking the same.


Well Hank - My input...no big thing, but yes, I made my first post and was called an 'Upsetting member'.  I equated that to a 'DISRUPTER' and thought, 'What a hard bunch'.

And on the same theme I have found that if some one is referred to as a Master or an Expert, they will quite often believe it. There is a word for it but I can't think of it right now, but it means, 'No one knows anything for sure.'  You may have noticed that some PHD's just slip right into this expert category so easy, but the good ones don't.


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Metalman
jmccustomknives wrote:
After forge master, the rank should be -  "Dude, get of your computer and make something".  lol.  I'd drop the upsetting member, it may make guys think they aren't welcome. 

Okay, okay - Make something, okay.  This morning I was thinking about the aluminum stuff.  Aluminum is a very active metal...it can't stand to be in air with the oxygen otherwise it is turned to aluminum oxide, right.  Aluminum is soft, aluminum oxide is hard - two different things.  A fresh new aluminum surface will oxidize almost faster than one can see it oxidize.  If one looks closely to the surface of a piece of aluminum and swipes it with a file, one can see that the surface changes color as it oxidizes.  This oxidation helps keep the aluminum from being further destroyed.  

Aluminum oxide is a common abrasive in polishing compounds.  Anytime you see a 'white' polishing compound it is typically of an aluminum base.  It will polish your steel knife blades and most stones all the way up to just shy of diamond.  I just checked and Linde A, a popular polishing compound, I saw for $8 an ounce.  The price has come down.  Forty years ago it was twice that.

So you said get off my duff and make something...I went out in my shop and made something...some aluminum oxide polishing compound.  I wanted to make some before I said anything to make sure it worked.  I used the finest file I could find and filed me a quarter of a teaspoon of aluminum and did it with a very easy filing, to make the particles as small as I could.  Of course I didn't have much aluminum...It was oxidizing as it fell.  I was hoping for most of it to be aluminum oxide.  I mixed it into a teaspoon of hand lotion and tried it.  It worked just fine polishing a piece of old tarnished brass.

I only mention this because this is a 'Practical Blacksmithing Forum' and you said, "Make something."...five minutes of total time.  I probable could have made it harder by using the oxygen from my welding bottle.

I just noticed that now I am a 'Drifting member'.  Well this may sound a little Drifty to some.

Hey, I would like to clarify this...although I think this is correct but the water may be muddied.  I think that usually 'GOOD' Aluminum oxide is usually made by first dissolving aluminum in an acid, possible hydrochloric acid and it ends up white.  When I did it there was too much just plain aluminum in it.  It had definitely too much of the grey color and possibly some, or most of the polishing effect was due to just the fine particles of aluminum.  I think that I would have to make it fine like flour for my idea to work good.  I had never done it before.  But I am going to look into it some more.     


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Metalmelt
Mine said moderator for a while, I've been demoted.
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Galt's Glutch Forge
Well, I can say this about this topic. It's going to lead into my next discussion.

Did anybody read the latest edition of the Hammers blow? The topic questions who's qualified to use the word blacksmith to Define what they do?
I'll create a thread for that question and put my two cents worth in from the disciplines I've done in the past.
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