jmccustomknives
Ok, before you get excited and junk, it's anthracite.  I picked up a bag to try but haven't fired it up yet.  It looks just like some other I've used.  I wouldn't recommend it for bladesmithing, but for playing around it will do.  It's cheap too.  I like cheap.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Well, that's interesting. And very cheap. I buy my 50 lbs bags of bituminous for $25 a bag. . . I'm not sure exactly how it is to work with anthracite, but from what I think I remember, it needs a constant air supply, and it doesn't coke up. Can anyone jog my memory who has worked with anthracite?
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jmccustomknives
Your exactly right.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
How easy it is to take what we have for granted. There's a coal dealer in the next town. Pull up and ask for blacksmithing coal and they go to the yard and shovel a 100 lbs. bag for you for 20 bucks. Next time I'm in I'll ask if they ship it out. If so I'll post the contact info on the forum.
code[Maglio.gif]  Keep the fires burning hot!
2020 ABANA Conference in Sarasota New York. June 3rd. through June 6th. Plan now!
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jmccustomknives
Hank, Alabama's swimming in coal but that doesn't mean it's easy to get.  I fired up the forge and worked with it.  Some interesting stuff.  Usually I'll take 4-5 open pine cones and put them in the pot, light them and cover.  The fire is going nearly instantly.  I made 2 attempts at starting the anthracite this way.  The third time I used a little green coal then covered the fire with the anthracite.  It took a while to get things going.  The most interesting thing about this stuff was it didn't break into little pieces like green coal.  The fire didn't have much in the way of flames, resembling the mantle on a gas lantern instead.  I wouldn't use it for forge welding as putting material in the coals is difficult due to the large size but for work where you want to closely watch the steel by laying it on top it is excellent.  I'll keep a bag or two around for this purpose.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Now I'm even more interested in getting some. . .
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remyrange
i just used some Tractor Supply nut Coal, and let me tell you, it's awesome for what I do. it's hard to lite, but one you know the trick, I can get a usable fire lit in about 5 minutes. It burns really hot, and with almost no smoke. The trick I use to lite, is to take some charcoal from my fire pit, poor a little bit of lamp oil on it, stack a little bit of coal over it. lite, crank, and within 5 minutes the charcoal has burned off, and the anthrocite is glowing nicely.
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jmccustomknives
remyrange wrote:
i just used some Tractor Supply nut Coal, and let me tell you, it's awesome for what I do. it's hard to lite, but one you know the trick, I can get a usable fire lit in about 5 minutes. It burns really hot, and with almost no smoke. The trick I use to lite, is to take some charcoal from my fire pit, poor a little bit of lamp oil on it, stack a little bit of coal over it. lite, crank, and within 5 minutes the charcoal has burned off, and the anthrocite is glowing nicely.


Charcoal is a good way to start the stuff for sure.  I've even known guys to mix a little charcoal in their coke so it will keep smoldering longer.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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