jmccustomknives
So, what within reason would you guys like to see me make for this?

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
Ok, executive decision.
The ingredients; 52100 Med. Chromium steel, 5/8" crane cable, Wenge, Vulcanized paper.
P7080018.JPG 

The cable is forge welded then flattened.
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The flattened cable is cut to 7" and tack welded onto the 51200.

P7080021.JPG 

The billet is forge welded.
P7080022.JPG 

Forge welding done, time to shape.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
After the weld was finished the end was cut off.
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The tip was started.
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The handle was started.
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Now that the handle is in place a hot cut hardie was used to make the choil.

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Using the horn a counter curve was forged in.  This will allow the blade to end up strait when the edge is forged in.

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The edge was forged in.

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The blade was then normalized (heated to just below non magnetic and let cool in the air to black) and annealed.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
The blade was then rough ground (edge thickness roughly the same as a dime). DSCN4744.JPG 

Next it was heated to nonmagnetic and quenched in oil.
DSCN4747.JPG 
Notice the cables pattern already showing up when it was wiped down.  After the quench the blade was tempered at 430F for an hour.
DSCN4748.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
After tempering the blade was ground with 60 grit belts.  Then finished with a 120, 240 and finally a 400 grit belt.  The blade was put in ferric chloride for a few minutes to bring out some pattern. 
DSCN4750.JPG  DSCN4752.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
Great executive decision James. I have an interest in twisting metal after you weld the billet together then drawling out the billet to form the knife. Any pros or cons to this idea?
The blade looks good. 
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jmccustomknives
Hank Rearden wrote:
Great executive decision James. I have an interest in twisting metal after you weld the billet together then brawling out the billet to form the knife. Any pros or cons to this idea?
The blade look good. 


It depends on what you are starting with.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
After a couple of etching sessions.  Remember guys, this will be traded with another person taking part in the IiTH.  DSCN4753.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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jmccustomknives
The handle is starting to come together.  I should have done some pics of this.  I started the handles by  tracing then rough cutting the slabs to shape and epoxied the vulcanized paper in place.  The one side was epoxied into place and left to harden (use slow cure epoxy).  When it had set the holes were drilled through and the other side put in place.  When it had set the holes were drilled though.  I do it this way because drilling through can be an adventure after heat treating.  Even if you don't thing you've hardened the handle residual hardening can occur and you'll smoke the bit and ruin the handle.

After everything was set the handle was sanded down.  Currently it had been sanded down, rubbed with steel wool and given one coat of tung oil.
DSCN4763.JPG 

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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NorrinRadd
That's an excellent project. You make it look easy.[biggrin]
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