I'm liquidating my parents estate and I'm wondering what the items in the attached photos is worth. Sorry, the photos were taken in bad light and there is junk piled on everything.

There's a forge with hand crank blower, various "tongs", anvil on a stump, leg vice, grinding wheel and some kind of "basin" on a stand behind the grinding wheel that I just noticed. No brand names except on the blower.

I'm not expecting exact values from these images, just rough ballpark estimates.
Thanks for your help in advance.

[20190908-113908]  [20190908-113647]  [20190908-113712]  [20190908-113756]  [20190908-113801]  [20190908-113835]
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Scrambler82
First, I am really not the one to price these items.
Second, more pictures of the Anvil would help put price on it.
Both ends and the side with writing on it !
A close shot of the top will determine the shadows in the picture you posted.

What is the height of the Vice ?
Does the screw work well, is it loose ?
Any cracks ?

Diameter of the grinding stone might help.
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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jmccustomknives
Some of the value depends on location, but here's some rough estimates of what I see (and have sold) stuff like this for.

Tongs:  $10-25 ea
The large coal forge:  $500
Small coal forge:  $100
Blower:  $120 functioning, $50 not
The anvil looks to be English in the 100-120lb range, judging from the pics:  $350-450. 
The vice doesn't look complete:  $100 if it functions
The sharpening wheel, $300

Looks like there's a lot more.  If your in an area where stuff like this is rare/hard to find a well advertised auction might be the way to go.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Metalmelt
I agree, but it does depend on the location. Could sell for much more. I'm guessing Montana???

There must be some hammers and hardy tools somewhere. They can fetch a lot also.
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Scrambler82
Montman, How about pictures often Anvil ?
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Montman
I'm location in central Illinois.
Thanks for the information so far. I'll get better pictures and some measurements.
I tried out the grinding wheel and it actually turns surprisingly smoothly when I stepped on the petals.
I missed the small forge with blower the first time but have a picture now attached. Blower works fine but a little noisy. The blower says "Champion Blower & Forge Co." and "Lancaster PA. U.S.A." Attaching new photos of small forge.
20190911_143045.jpg  20190911_143038.jpg  20190911_143026.jpg 
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Montman
Blower on larger forge took a few partial turns of the handle each direction before it spun freely. Didn't take any real force to get it spinning free.
20190911_143417.jpg  20190911_143153.jpg 
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Montman
Writing on anvil hard to read. Three pictures attached. I'll wire brush them to see if I can make them clearer.
20190911_143302.jpg  20190911_143245.jpg  20190911_143233.jpg 
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Scrambler82
The Anvil is a Vulcan, per the Markings, if I remember correctly and see correctly (15 on the base), it is a 150 pounder, but could weigh in at a little more.   It is a Cast Anvil with a thin Hardened Steel Plate on the top, my worry is what appears to be a groove in the middle of the top, in the middle of the Steel Plate or what was a steel plate !  The Plate has been ground through and the cast iron base isn't designed to take much of a beating. (Groove is Dusk Shadow) !
[20190908-113756] 

(Paragraph deleted by OP) !

The large Coal Forge looks great, if I was local and wanted to do Cool Heating I would be all over that !

Good Luck on your sale, hope you get a good price for all of it !
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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Montman
Don't know what the anvil was used for in the past. My dad threw tomahawks in competition - and he made them too. But he made them by cutting out parts and welding or brazing them together. He said he had sold tomahawks to people in something like 40 states of the United States. (Gentle Ben Tomahawks)
He wanted to get into forging tomahawks and knives and started setting up a little blacksmiths shop. But he never got to use it. Started having health problems then passed away in 2013.

So - that dark line on the top of the anvil is actually where a tool was laying since about 2010. I removed the tool to take the picture. So what you are seeing in the photo is 9 years of dust on the anvil except where the tool was laying.

Thanks for the info about the anvil. I'll dust it off and maybe rub some oil on it. Maybe that will help the images. I'll photograph the top of the anvil and look for the top plate.

thanks
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Scrambler82
My apologies, on the Anvil comments, it really looks, to me, like a cut out.   That changed everything.
Their is slight damage to the top but not bad and it is 150 pounds, maybe you should try Blacksmithing !

Good Luck on your sale, don't jump at the first offer.
Do It Right The First Time !
GrevB
Location: SoCal, USA
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jmccustomknives
The anvil is a Vulcan, not English.  My bad.  These are cast iron with a tool steel top.   They aren't the greatest anvils but serviceable.  The value is about the same though.

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Marc
You have a bunch of very old and still useful tools. The Vulcan anvils are good because they are quiet. No ringing to annoy the neighbours or your wife. 
The price of vintage tools is a bit of a gamble and the market for them is very small. Try to get the best out of them by cleaning them and oiling them or rubbing graphite on them. 
Best of luck
The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
Adrian Pierce Rogers
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Montman
Thanks to everyone for the information. I'm much better informed now than before.
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