TobyDavidson
Hi,

I am not in the blacksmith world, but love working with metal.  I've been welding for a couple of years now, starting with a vehicle restoration but very quickly branched into the, 'I wonder if I could fabricate that out of some bar and sheet?'.

We bought an old house about 12 months ago, which we have subsequently found used to be the old village smithy, before being turned into a petrol station and car garage.  

When we were clearing the garden, we found the wheel shown in the pictures.  

We are going to set it up, probably more as a garden ornament, but have little idea on how it would have been set originally, or if it had a specific purpose rather than just 'wheel for grinding stuff on'.  Many of the images we have found on the web show similar wheels but without the long handles, so I am not sure what type of stand or setting this wheel would have been in. IMG_0773.jpg  IMG_0774.jpg  IMG_0771.jpg  IMG_0772.jpg 

I am sure you can see my current level of knowledge is practically zero, but my passion for working with metal is growing by every project I work on.  I would be grateful for any ideas or history you could share on the type of set up we may have found at the house if we walked in about 100 years ago when it was still the Blacksmiths.
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NorrinRadd
That's a great find. I've never seen one with that long of a shaft either. There may be no telling how or why it was set up that way. Could be some specific purpose that this particular Smith came up with, disappeared when he did.

One thought comes to mind, maybe to sharpen very long blades, like for farm equipment?

Hopefully someone will know.
Thanks for posting it.
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TobyDavidson
Thanks for the idea.

The farming piece would make sense, we are in the heart of farming land in Wiltshire, England.
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jmccustomknives
I'm not 100% sure what that was for.  My sense is it's not a grinding stone for steel implements.  The way the shaft is made seems like it's for slower rpm's than steel would require.  I wonder if it's not a grinding stone for grain or something else like that?

Rule #10;  "I can make that" translates to; "I'm to cheap to buy it new."

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Hank Rearden
First thing I see is how the shims are used  to center the wheel. The crank on one end and it looks like a trip lever on the other. My guess is it's a grain mill. Each trip allows a measured amount out of a storage supply bin. My 2 cents. Keep the change.
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Skarzs the Cave Troll
Yeah, they used stone wheels to grind grains as well.
One thought that I had was that it may have been used in a water mill, but it's unlikely.
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NorrinRadd
The grain mill theory makes sense. It probably started out a lot bigger too.
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